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  • Sen. Ron Johnson, Wisconsin Republican, said he is troubled by the lack of cooperation from the Obama administration and the inspector general's office in regards to the Secret Service prostitution probe. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    Departure adds to concerns about Secret Service probe

    The former head of the Department of Homeland Security's advanced research unit is the latest high-profile DHS official to join a contracting supergroup co-founded by the former director of the Secret Service, reinforcing the concerns of a Senate subcommittee that the agency's inspector general was influenced in his review of the service's prostitution scandal.

  • Homeland Security Secretary Janet A. Napolitano promised a complete investigation into Secret Service agents' use of prostitutes. Some of her close allies are suspected of pressuring the inspector general to report favorable findings. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    Napolitano aides probed by Senate in Secret Service's prostitution scandal

    A Senate panel is investigating whether former Homeland Security Secretary Janet A. Napolitano's close allies pushed the department's inspector general to tread lightly in its investigation of the prostitution scandal involving the U.S. Secret Service.

  • **FILE** President Obama (left) walks past a Secret Service agent after welcoming the NCAA college football BCS National Champion University of Alabama Crimson Tide to the South Lawn of the White House to honor their 14th championship on April 19, 2012, in Washington. (Associated Press)

    Secret Service gets first woman director

    President Obama on Tuesday appointed the first woman ever to head the Secret Service, an agency still struggling to recover from a high-profile sex scandal.

  • Illustration by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

    KESSLER: Reeling in a reckless Secret Service

    Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan's retirement last month is an opportunity to require Senate confirmation of any successor.

  • ** File ** Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on Dec. 3, 2009. (Associated Press)

    Secret Service chief Mark Sullivan to step down

    Mark Sullivan , the head of the Secret Service is stepping down after 30 years with the agency.

  • Mark Sullivan, director of the United States Secret Service, testifies before the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs at the Dirksen Building in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, May 23, 2012. Sullivan repeatedly spoke to the professional and ethical nature of most people in the Secret Service, but he did say that they took the actions in Cartagena seriously and will make every effort to ensure that such actions do not occur again. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

    Senate panel hears of wider Secret Service misbehavior

    The lawmaker leading an inquiry into the Secret Service prostitution scandal reported dozens of "troubling" episodes of past misbehavior Wednesday and appealed to insiders to come forward with what they know as investigators try to determine whether a culture of misconduct took root in the storied agency.

  • Mark Sullivan, director of the United States Secret Service, testifies before the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs at the Dirksen Building in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, May 23, 2012. Sullivan repeatedly spoke to the professional and ethical nature of most people in the Secret Service, but he did say that they took the actions in Cartagena seriously and will make every effort to ensure that such actions do not occur again. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

    Secret Service prostitute scandal reveals pattern, senators contend

    The director of the Secret Service told Congress on Wednesday that the recent Colombian prostitution scandal was a one-time occurrence, but deeply skeptical lawmakers said he is in denial and the evidence points to a larger pattern of misconduct within the agency charged with protecting the president.

  • Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan, seen here in December 2009, has spent half his life at the agency and could have retired nearly 10 years ago. (Associated Press)

    Secret Service chief surviving agency scandal

    The director of the Secret Service, Mark Sullivan, could have retired from government nearly 10 years ago and avoided the scandal of the White House gate-crashers and, more recently, the one involving a dozen agents, officers and supervisors implicated in a prostitution case.

  • ** FILE ** In this April 25, 2012, file photo, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Secret Service prostitution scandal. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Chaperones among new Secret Service conduct rules

    Embarrassed by a prostitution scandal, the Secret Service will assign chaperones on some trips to enforce new rules of conduct that make clear that excessive drinking, entertaining foreigners in their hotel rooms and cavorting in disreputable establishments are no longer tolerated.

  • FILE - In this April 25, 2012 file photo, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Expanding the prostitution investigation, the Secret Service acknowledges it is checking whether its employees consorted with strippers and prostitutes in advance of President Barack Obama's visit last year to El Salvador. The disclosure comes not long after the Homeland Security secretary assured skeptical senators that the prostitution scandal in Colombia appeared to be an isolated incident. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    New Secret Service rules on alcohol, unsavory bars

    Seeking to shake the disgrace of a prostitution scandal, the Secret Service late Friday tightened conduct rules for its agents to prohibit them from drinking excessively, visiting disreputable establishments while traveling or bringing foreigners to their hotel rooms.

  • **FILE** House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Rep. Peter King, New York Republican, speaks March 10, 2011, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Associated Press)

    Pressure mounts to fire Secret Service agents in hooker scandal

    Most of the Secret Service agents embroiled in a South American prostitution scandal are likely to lose their jobs — some as soon as Monday — a powerful Republican lawmaker said Sunday.

  • ** FILE ** Sen. Chuck Grassley, Iowa Republican (Associated Press)

    Grassley: Were White House staff involved in prostitution scandal?

    Sen. Chuck Grassley, the ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, is questioning the U.S. Secret Service about possible involvement of White House staff in the Colombian prostitution scandal.

  • **FILE** A Secret Service agent stands Oct. 28, 2008, near then-presidential candidate Barack Obama at a rally in Norfolk, Va. (Associated Press)

    Lawmaker: More firings likely at U.S. Secret Service

    A top lawmaker briefed on the investigation into a Secret Service prostitution scandal predicted more firings would follow the forced ouster of three agency employees.

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