Topic - Osama bin Laden

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  • Lawyer for bin Laden son-in-law guilty in tax case

    The lawyer who represented Osama bin Laden's son-in-law at his recent terrorism trial pleaded guilty Monday in Syracuse to a federal charge of impeding the IRS.

  • FILE - In this March 28, 2003 file photo, radical Muslim cleric Mustafa Kamel Mustafa prays in a street outside his Mosque in north London. Mustafa faces charges he conspired to support al-Qaida by trying in 1999 to set up a terrorist training camp in Bly, Ore., and by helping abduct two American tourists and 14 others in Yemen in 1998. Jury selection for his terrorism trial begins in New York on Monday, April 14, 2014.  (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

    Jury to be picked in NY trial of Egyptian preacher

    Jury selection begins Monday in the trial of a disabled Egyptian Islamic preacher extradited from Great Britain on charges he conspired to support al-Qaida, in part by trying to create a training camp in Oregon 15 years ago.

  • U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks during a news conference in New York, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Holder says the successful prosecution of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law in New York shows terror trials can be safely held in the United States.(AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Holder: Khalid Sheik Mohammad won't be tried in NY

    U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said Tuesday he still believes Manhattan is the right place to put the self-professed mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks on trial but he won't revisit the decision to have his fate decided by a military tribunal instead.

  • Senate report: Torture didn't lead to bin Laden; CIA disputes conclusion

    A Senate investigation concludes waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods provided no key evidence in the hunt for Osama bin Laden, according to congressional aides and outside experts familiar with a still-secret, 6,200-page report. The finding could deepen the worst rift in years between lawmakers and the CIA.

  • US official: NY terror case a win for civil courts

    A jury's conviction of the al-Qaida spokesman who warned Americans that the "storm of airplanes" would not stop after the Sept. 11 attacks prompted Attorney General Eric Holder to claim victory for the civil court system, signaling terror suspects arrested in the future in the U.S. or abroad will routinely face justice in civil courts rather than military tribunals.

  • FILE - In this undated image made from video and provided by by Al-Jazeera, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, is shown.  Osama bin Laden's son-in-law and spokesman still maintains that there was justification for the September 11, 2001 attacks orchestrated by al-Qaida upon the United States. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, who is being tried in a New York City courtroom for conspiring to kill Americans, is using courtroom theater, intentionally or not, to press his case that the United States is such a bully in the Middle East that even killing civilians was justified. (AP Photo/Al-Jazeera, File)

    Bin Laden son-in-law convicted at NYC terror trial

    Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, the voice of fiery al Qaeda propaganda videotapes after the Sept. 11 attacks, was convicted Wednesday of conspiring to kill Americans for his role as the terror group's spokesman.

  • Feds praise verdict against bin Laden son-in-law

    Osama bin Laden's son-in-law was convicted Wednesday for his role as al-Qaida's fiery chief spokesman after 9/11 - a verdict prosecutors said vindicated the Obama administration's strategy of bringing terror suspects to justice in civilian court.

  • Edwin Meese, a head of a commission investigating FBI counterterrorism efforts, says the panel will examine revelations about a human asset in direct contact with Osama bin Laden in the early 1990s. One of the panel's mandates, he said, is to dig into "what evidence wasn't known to the 9/11 Commission." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

    Panel to investigate handling of FBI mole; asset was close to bin Laden pre-9/11

    Members of a special panel examining the FBI's counterterrorism efforts over the past decade say they will "push hard" for an answer to why the bureau has never revealed information about a human asset it reportedly had in direct contact with al Qaeda mastermind Osama bin Laden during the early 1990s.

  • In this courtroom sketch Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, right, testifies at his trial Wednesday, March 19, 2014, in New York, on charges he conspired to kill Americans and aid al-Qaida as a spokesman for the terrorist group.  Listening to testimony are Judge Lewis Kaplan, upper left, and clerk Andrew Mohan, center left, as an image of Khalid Sheik Mohammed, the self-professed architect of the Sept. 11 attacks, appears on a video monitor. In his surprise testimony, Abu Ghaith recounted the night of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, when bin Laden sent a messenger to drive him into a mountainous area for a meeting inside a cave in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Williams)

    No verdict yet in al-Qaida spokesman's terror case

    Jurors began deliberations Tuesday in the terrorism trial of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law but ended the day without reaching a verdict on charges he conspired to kill Americans and aid al-Qaida as its spokesman after the Sept. 11 attacks.

  • FILE - In this undated image made from video and provided by by Al-Jazeera, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, is shown.  Osama bin Laden's son-in-law and spokesman still maintains that there was justification for the September 11, 2001 attacks orchestrated by al-Qaida upon the United States. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, who is being tried in a New York City courtroom for conspiring to kill Americans, is using courtroom theater, intentionally or not, to press his case that the United States is such a bully in the Middle East that even killing civilians was justified. (AP Photo/Al-Jazeera, File)

    Lawyers paint opposing portraits of bin Laden kin

    After the Sept. 11 attacks, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law became a key player in al-Qaida's campaign of terror, a federal prosecutor told jurors Monday, while a defense lawyer argued that the government had no evidence against his client and was playing on the jury's fears.

  • Bin Laden associates show no remorse in statements

    In public statements a week apart, al-Qaida's self-professed Sept. 11 mastermind and a Kuwaiti imam who met with Osama bin Laden in a cave soon after the attacks once again demonstrated that time hasn't softened their anti-American views.

  • The sun rises above Camp Delta at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba, on Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. During nearly 12 years of legal disputes and political battles, the United States has put off deciding the fate of al Qaeda and Taliban militants held at Guantanamo Bay, captured after the Sept. 11 attacks but denied quick or full access to the American justice system. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    U.S. may free suspected Osama bin Laden bodyguard at Gitmo

    An accused bodyguard of killed al Qaeda head Osama bin Laden may win his freedom from Guantanamo Bay, the latest in a White House push to clear and close the Cuba-based facility.

  • ** FILE ** This image made from video provided by by Al-Jazeera shows Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law and spokesman. (AP Photo/Al-Jazeera, File)

    Al Qaeda spokesman recounts 9/11 aftermath

    Osama bin Laden's hours in a dark Afghanistan cave the evening of the Sept. 11 attacks were brought to light when his son-in-law testified in his own defense at his terrorism trial, portraying the al-Qaida leader as worried and apprehensive as he contemplated how America would respond.

  • In this courtroom sketch, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, right, testifies at his trial Wednesday, March 19, 2014, in New York, on charges he conspired to kill Americans and aid al-Qaida as a spokesman for the terrorist group.  Listening to testimony are Judge Lewis Kaplan, center, and defense attorney Stanley Cohen, at podium. In his surprise testimony, Abu Ghaith recounted the night of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, when the al-Qaida leader sent a messenger to drive him into a mountainous area for a meeting inside a cave in Afghanistan. "Did you learn what happened? We are the ones who did it," Abu Ghaith, recalled bin Laden telling him. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Williams)

    Ex-al-Qaida spokesman recalls 9/11 with bin Laden

    Osama bin Laden's son-in-law offered a rare glimpse of the al-Qaida leader in the hours after the Sept. 11 attacks, recounting during surprise testimony Wednesday in a Manhattan courtroom how the two met that night in a cave in Afghanistan.

  • Families of three fallen Navy SEALs are suing Afghan President Hamid Karzai, his security forces and Iran. The lawsuit accuses Mr. Karzai of accepting bribes for the deaths of U.S. servicemen and of leaking details of a SEAL mission to the Taliban. (Associated Press)

    Families sue Karzai, Iran for '11 chopper shootdown

    Three U.S. families filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his security forces, accusing them of betraying their sons in the Aug. 6, 2011, helicopter shootdown that killed 30 Americans, 17 of them Navy SEALs.

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