Topic - Yingluck Shinawatra

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  • An armed Thai police officer, center, aims his rubber bullet rifle as medical team carry a injured person on a stretcher during a clash between police force and anti-government protesters Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Clashes between police and anti-government demonstrators in Bangkok left two people dead and 57 others injured Tuesday as riot police attempted to clear out protest camps around the Thai capital. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)

    Thai police clash with protesters, leaving 4 dead

    Hundreds of riot police attempted to clear out anti-government protest sites around Thailand's capital on Tuesday, triggering clashes that left four people dead and 64 others injured.

  • Gunbattles broke out Tuesday as hundreds of riot police made their strongest attempt to clear protest sites around Thailand's capital, killing several people and injuring scores of others. Protesters are angry about the government's failure to pay farmers. (Associated Press)

    Four dead in Bangkok as police attack barricades

    An eruption of gunfire and explosions killed four people and injured at least 64 Tuesday, when hundreds of riot police tried to remove protesters' barricades from the capital's streets — pushing the death toll to 14 in clashes that have hobbled downtown Bangkok since November.

  • A suspected gunman, center, is carried by a medic official, right, and anti-government protesters to an ambulance shortly after he was caught and beaten after firing a pistol to protesters, wounding one during a rally outside the Army Club Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra met Tuesday with the country's polling body to discuss the possibility of postponing a general election set for this weekend, even as protesters tried to disrupt the talks. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

    Tumult as Thai PM discussed election delay

    Several hundred anti-government protesters on Tuesday laid siege to a meeting of Thailand's prime minister with the country's polling body to discuss the possibility of postponing a general election set for this weekend. Two people were injured, one with a gunshot wound, as violence broke out on the fringes of the crowd.

  • Thai anti-government protesters use chain to lock up the gate at the fishery department as they close down the office Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Twin explosions shook an anti-government demonstration site in Thailand's capital, wounding more than dozens of people in the latest violence to hit Bangkok as the nation's increasingly bloody political crisis drags on. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

    Thailand declares state of emergency for protests

    Thailand's government on Tuesday declared a state of emergency in Bangkok and surrounding areas to cope with protests that have stirred up violent attacks, adding to the country's monthslong sense of crisis.

  • Thai prime minister struggles to stay in power

    From inside her "war room" in a temporary office at the Defense Ministry, Thailand's beleaguered Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is watching television feeds of flag-waving protesters trying to bring down her government.

  • A Thai anti-government protester is silhouetted on an umbrella during a rally at the Victory Monument Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's political crisis ground on Tuesday as the country's prime minister reiterated her refusal to quit as protesters trying to topple her administration blocked key roads in the heart of Bangkok for a second day. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

    Thai tensions rise after gun attack on protesters

    Gunshots rang out in the heart of Thailand's capital overnight in an apparent attack on anti-government protesters early Wednesday that wounded at least two people and ratcheted up tensions in Thailand's deepening political crisis.

  • Anti-government protesters with national flags gather for a rally at Asok intersection Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's political crisis ground on Tuesday as the country's prime minister reiterated her refusal to quit as protesters trying to topple her administration blocked key roads in the heart of Bangkok for a second day. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Questions, answers on Thailand political protests

    Anti-government protesters in Thailand are blocking key intersections in the heart of Bangkok to pressure the prime minister to quit and bring the government to a standstill. Here are some questions and answers about the latest round of political unrest:

  • Blockade: Protesters halt much of the traffic in Bangkok's central business district as part of a campaign to overthrow the Thai prime minister. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    Thailand protests prompt security alert for Americans

    Tens of thousands of anti-government demonstrators aiming to "shut down" Bangkok blocked major thoroughfares into the center of Thailand's capital Monday, while Thai authorities did little to stop the campaign to topple the elected government and replace it with a panel of appointed technocrats.

  • A speaker rallies anti-government protestors with a banner reading: "Shutdown Bangkok" outside the MBK Center shopping mall in the Pathumwan district, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Bangkok, Thailand. Anti-government protesters took over key intersections in Thailand's capital Monday, halting much of the traffic into Bangkok's central business district as part of a months-long campaign to thwart elections and overthrow the democratically elected prime minister. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

    Thai protesters block roads in bid to shut capital

    Anti-government protesters aiming to shut down central Bangkok took over key intersections Monday, halting much of the traffic into the Thai capital's main business district as part of a months-long campaign to overthrow the democratically elected prime minister.

  • A Thai anti-government protester gestures while listening to a speech from the stage during a rally at the Democracy Monument in Bangkok, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014. Anti-government demonstrators were preparing Sunday to occupy major intersections of Thailand's congested capital in what they say is an effort to shut down Bangkok, a plan that has raised fears of violence that could trigger a military coup. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

    Thai protesters block roads in bid to shut capital

    Anti-government protesters took over key intersections in Thailand's capital Monday, halting much of the traffic into Bangkok's central business district as part of a months-long campaign to thwart elections and overthrow the democratically elected prime minister.

  • In this Nov. 11, 2013 photo, anti-government protesters gather to listen speeches at the Democracy Monument in Bangkok, Thailand. Anti-government protesters are planning to shut down Thailand's capital on Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 by blocking traffic at key intersections, providing a fitting metaphor for the country's politics: no way forward, no backing out. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)

    Thai road protest could lead to political dead end

    BANGKOK (AP) — Anti-government protesters are planning to shut down Thailand's capital on Monday by blocking traffic at key intersections, providing a fitting metaphor for the country's politics: no way forward, no backing out.

  • Thai riot police fire rubber bullets at anti-government protesters during a rally at the Labor Ministry in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013. Rock-throwing protesters trying to halt preparations for elections fought police in the Thai capital on Thursday, escalating their campaign to topple the country's beleaguered government. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)

    Thai election body urges delay in polls amid clash

    Thailand's election commission on Thursday urged the government to delay upcoming polls as clashes between security forces and anti-government protesters killed a police officer and injured nearly 100 people, adding to political turmoil threatening to tear apart the country.

  • Thai anti-government protesters, right, push through line of riot police during a rally at the Department of Special Investigation (DSI) on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Monday, Dec. 23, 2013. About 5,000 protesters took part in the rally and later stormed into the DSI office building when the DSI has charged the protest leaders on illegal demonstrations and frozen their bank accounts last week. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

    Thai protesters try to block election sign-up

    Anti-government protesters determined to unseat Thailand's prime minister surrounded a Bangkok sports stadium in an unsuccessful attempt to physically block political parties from registering for a February election.

  • A masked Thai anti-government protester holds a banner that reads "execute bad people" while gathering outside the Government House following a march rally Monday, Dec. 9, 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. Desperate to defuse Thailand's deepening political crisis, Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra on Monday said she is dissolving the lower house of Parliament and called for early elections. But the moves did nothing to stem a growing tide of more than 150,000 protesters vowing to overthrow her in one of the nation's largest demonstrations in years. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

    Thai prime minister dissolves Parliament, calls elections

    Desperate to defuse Thailand's deepening political crisis, Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra on Monday said she is dissolving the lower house of Parliament and called for early elections. But the moves did nothing to stem a growing tide of more than 150,000 protesters vowing to overthrow her in one of the nation's largest demonstrations in years.

  • Anti-government protesters shout slogans at the Democracy Monument in Bangkok on Sunday, Dec. 8, 2013. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

    Thailand crisis deepens as opposition quits Parliament

    Thailand's main opposition party resigned from Parliament on Sunday to protest what it called "the illegitimacy" of an elected government with which it no longer can work. The move deepens the country's latest political crisis one day before new street demonstrations that many fear could turn violent.

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Quotations
  • In opening remarks to the commission witnessed by reporters, Yingluck told the election commissioners that in 66 out of the country's 76 provinces, the election could proceed, so that postponing the vote could be an option with the remaining areas.

    Tumult as Thai PM discussed election delay →

  • Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said the government, through a newly established Center for Maintaining Peace and Order, "will take care of the situation according to international practices, which is something we have always said.

    Thailand declares state of emergency for protests →

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