L. Todd Wood — Behind the Curtain - Washington Times
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L. Todd Wood — Behind the Curtain

L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood, a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, flew special operations helicopters supporting SEAL Team 6, Delta Force and others. After leaving the military, he pursued his other passion, finance, spending 18 years on Wall Street trading emerging market debt, and later, writing. The first of his many thrillers is "Currency." Todd is a contributor to Fox Business, Newsmax TV, Moscow Times, the New York Post, the National Review, Zero Hedge and others. For more information about L. Todd Wood, visit LToddWood.com.

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It never ceases to amaze me the way the left attempts to rewrite history. I find it especially dangerous that our millennial generation is so misinformed about the past, communism in particular. Marxism and communism did not die after the Cold War was won, they simply morphed and went underground in our media and education system, only to raise their ugly heads decades later.

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On a recent trip to Chisinau to investigate the political situation in the tiny former Soviet republic, I had the pleasure of meeting with a very distinguished gentleman, a former colonel in the Moldovan armed forces, who fought in the war against pro-Russian separatists in the early 1990s during the Transdniester conflict, a small strip of land bordering Ukraine

A cautionary tale from Ukraine on prosecutors and power

As special counsel Robert Mueller announced his first indictments of Paul Manafort and others in the Russia election hacking probe, it seems a good time to examine what can happen when a prosecutor is weaponized to attack political and business adversaries.

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A small country fights a big war against Russian hybrid warfare

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- The Washington Times

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