Communities — Voices and Insights - Washington Times
Skip to content

Communities

Related Articles

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket (Photo: Associated Press)

Space: The next frontier

Ask any baby boomer and there are two dates they will remember and can tell you where they were when the news hit. The first is Nov. 22, 1963, when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated.

Slavery, war and the artifacts left behind

Destruction of historical statues, icons and documents appears to be one of the latest fads of the Left. This idea seemed a bit quaint for the "hate America" fringe until it caught fire with the Leftist establishment.

Communist party supporters carry portraits of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin, left, and Soviet dictator Josef Stalin during a demonstration marking the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Bolshevik revolution in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Thousands of Communist demonstrators marked the centennial of the 1917 Bolshevik revolution Tuesday by marching across downtown Moscow. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

A history deficit obscures the real crimes done to Russia

It never ceases to amaze me the way the left attempts to rewrite history. I find it especially dangerous that our millennial generation is so misinformed about the past, communism in particular. Marxism and communism did not die after the Cold War was won, they simply morphed and went underground in our media and education system, only to raise their ugly heads decades later.

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2017 file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. meet with reporters outside the White House in Washington. Congress is still trying to send President Donald Trump his first unqualified legislative triumph, nearly six months after Republicans grabbed full control of Washington. Now, lawmakers are returning from their July 4 recess with an added objective _ averting some full-blown political disasters.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) **FILE**

Tax reform: How the GOP can win big

The GOP needs the right kind of win, not a simple "check-the-box" win or a perfunctory "we-finally-did-something" win. No, the GOP needs the kind of win that will give Americans the confidence that Republicans should remain in control of Washington after next year's elections.

U.S. Capitol

Lawmakers' CPFB repeal worthy of (some) applause

Congress deserves applause for repealing an obtuse rule prohibiting agreements requiring arbitration to resolve consumer finance disputes issued by the Consumer Protection Finance Board (CPFB). The rule's chief beneficiaries were trial lawyers, not bank customers.

Time for 21st century spiritual creativity

America has always been a spiritually creative country. From the insights of the Founding Fathers to the various historical periods of "great awakenings," America has been a startup nation for repackaging the spiritual impulse.

U.S. veterans may need to deal with U.S. corruption

On a recent trip to Chisinau to investigate the political situation in the tiny former Soviet republic, I had the pleasure of meeting with a very distinguished gentleman, a former colonel in the Moldovan armed forces, who fought in the war against pro-Russian separatists in the early 1990s during the Transdniester conflict, a small strip of land bordering Ukraine

A cautionary tale from Ukraine on prosecutors and power

As special counsel Robert Mueller announced his first indictments of Paul Manafort and others in the Russia election hacking probe, it seems a good time to examine what can happen when a prosecutor is weaponized to attack political and business adversaries.

Illustration on Reagan's unflagging state of effectiveness throughout his two terms as president by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Let Trump be Trump

It is common knowledge that the reason Ronald Reagan fired his first 1980 campaign manager John Sears was his loss to George H.W. Bush in the Iowa caucuses straw poll. Mr. Sears was replaced by William Casey, with Edwin Meese and Michael Deaver getting more involved in the campaign and all of them urging to let "Reagan to be Reagan."

A woman walks past a poster warning against foreign spies displayed in an alleyway in Beijing, China, Wednesday, April 20, 2016. China is marking National Security Education Day with the poster warning young female government workers about dating handsome foreigners, who could turn out to have secret agendas. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

China's new video urges children to spy, snitch on parents

In an effort which would make Mao and Stalin proud, China is getting families into the spying game. To celebrate its first National Security Education Day on Nov. 10th, the communist government is launching a ten-minute video for children explaining how to tell if someone in your family is working for a foreign government.