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An activist of the "ZAD" movement (Zone to Defend) sprays champagne while celebrating with others after French PM announced the government's official decision to abandon the airport project, in Notre-Dame-des-Landes, outside the city of Nantes, western France, Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018. French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe says that the government has decided against building an airport in western France that has mobilized nearly a decade of sometimes violent protests and he told protesters occupying the site that they must leave. (AP Photo/Mathieu Pattier)

France abandons plans to build new airport in the west

- Associated Press

France will abandon divisive plans to build a new airport in the west, the prime minister announced Wednesday, ordering activists protesting the project for nearly a decade to leave their makeshift settlement.

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Minnesota woman retiring from museum manager position

- Associated Press

There is a log cabin that backs up to Olcott Park. In the summers, during Land of the Loon festival, families sit in its shade. Now, in the winter, they step through the snow as Betty Pond, manager of the Virginia Area Historical Society Heritage Museum, uses a key to unlock the building.

Trump travel ban to get day in Supreme Court

- Associated Press

The Supreme Court has agreed to decide the legality of the latest version of President Donald Trump's ban on travel to the United States by residents of six majority-Muslim countries.

Extra shirts hang inside of a senator's vehicle as the Capitol dome is reflected on Capitol Hill as a bitterly-divided Congress hurtles toward a government shutdown this weekend, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

AP Explains: Congress has shut down the govt. Now what?

Associated Press

The U.S. government shutdown began at midnight Friday as Democrats and Republicans failed to resolve a standoff over immigration and spending. Here's a look at what the parties are fighting over and what it means to shut down the government.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2017 file photo, Hawaii Emergency Management Agency officials work at the department's command center in Honolulu. Nearly 40 terrifying minutes passed between the time the Hawaii agency fired off a bogus alert about an incoming missile over the weekend and the moment the notice was canceled. The confusion _ and panic _ has raised questions about whether any state should be responsible for the notification _ especially as Washington and North Korea trade insults and threats. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)

Governor took 15 minutes to announce missile alert was false

- Associated Press

The Hawaii National Guard's top commander said Friday he told Gov. David Ige that a missile alert was a false alarm two minutes after it went out statewide. But the governor didn't tell the public until 15 minutes later.

Supreme Court to rule on Trump travel ban

Associated Press

The Supreme Court has agreed to decide the legality of the latest version of President Donald Trump's ban on travel to the United States by residents of six majority-Muslim countries.

Winter is here: "Game of Thrones" ice hotel opens in Finland

- Associated Press

A "Game of Thrones"-themed ice hotel complete with a bar and a chapel for weddings has opened in northern Finland in a joint effort by a local hotel chain and the U.S. producers of the hit TV series.

FILE - In this April 1, 2017 file photo, a service dog strolls through the isle inside a United Airlines plane at Newark Liberty International Airport while taking part in a training exercise, in Newark, N.J. Delta Air Lines says for safety reasons it will require owners of service and support animals to provide more information before their animal can fly in the passenger cabin, including an assurance that it's trained to behave itself.  (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Good dog, bad dog ... Delta wants to know before you board

- Associated Press

Delta Air Lines will soon require owners of service and support animals to provide more information before their animal can fly in the passenger cabin, including an assurance that it's trained to behave itself.