- The Washington Times - Sunday, February 13, 2005

Advertising & Marketing

What does the classic game “Battleship” have to do with a 10-year-old event marketing firm in Alexandria?

The strategic game is the inspiration behind Momentum Marketing’s name change to RedPeg Marketing.

The marketing and promotions company wanted a name that defined the agency and one that represented strategy, precision and impact.



“Clients are paying us to be the strategic planners for their brand,” said Brad Nierenberg, president of RedPeg Marketing, which uses a red peg in its logo similar to those used in the “Battleship” game. “We’ve got to be targeted and we’ve got to be strategic.”

The agency’s push for a name change is a result of the confusion in the industry over other firms with the name Momentum Marketing. The agency needed to set itself apart, so it became its own client and focused on a renaming and rebranding effort.

The name change wasn’t an easy decision

“It’s like changing a child’s name after he’s 10 years old,” Mr. Nierenberg said.

It took three years of researching, designing, testing and planning — whittling down 300 suggested names and 100 logos.

RedPeg’s more than 60 employees went through three days of training to understand the name and communicate the changes to their clients.

RedPeg will spread the word about its new name with direct mail and advertising in industry publications such as Promo magazine and Event Marketer magazine, said Liz DiLullo Brown, director of business development.

Mr. Nierenberg said clients are looking for more innovative branding techniques to get their name and products in front of a targeted audience. He says his agency is well-positioned to help them do that.

The company expects to hire as many as two dozen employees in the next several months. The goal is to hit $50 million in billings in five years. Last year, the agency had more than $20 million in billings.

RedPeg Marketing has additional offices in Charlotte, N.C., and Westport, Conn. Mr. Nierenberg hopes to have two more locations in Los Angeles and Chicago by the end of the year.

Another name change

The Dan Rosenthal Co. has tweaked its name to reflect the 15-year-old ad agency’s expanding leadership and its relationship with clients.

The new name, Rosenthal Partners, doesn’t mean partners have bought into the independent agency, but it reflects the strong employees with whom founder Dan Rosenthal has surrounded himself. It also focuses on the agency’s partnership with clients.

The agency, which has 35 employees, had $34 million in billings last year. Rosenthal Partners expects billings to reach $53 million in 2005.

New wins

• The Sugar Association Inc. has named Marriner Marketing Communications its new agency of record. The Columbia, Md., agency will create a consumer education campaign that focuses on the benefits of sugar.

• Qorvis Communications has added three technology clients to its roster: security solutions provider CyberGuard Corp., Phase Forward, which provides integrated data management for clinical trials and drug safety, and SunRocket, an Internet phone consumer education campaign that focuses on the benefits of sugar.

• Qorvis Communications has added three technology clients to its roster: security solutions provider CyberGuard Corp., Phase Forward, which provides integrated data management for clinical trials and drug safety, and SunRocket, an Internet phone service company based in Vienna, Va.

• Walczy Hamilton Tran of Bethesda was hired by Landmark National, an international resort developer, to provide marketing for its newest resort in Arcos, Spain.

• Merkle, a database marketing agency based in Lanham, has won new business with the Arthritis Foundation. Merkle is managing and executing a direct marketing pilot program in several states designed to boost participation in the foundation’s 2005 Arthritis Walk.

Got news? Donna De Marco can be reached at 202/636-4884. Advertising & Marketing runs every other Monday.

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