- The Washington Times - Friday, April 18, 2008

Spring and fall house tours and decorator showcases appeal to interior-design aficionados and people who just enjoy looking at the inside of homes that they can only dream of buying. These events let people explore homes decorated in upscale and sometimes unusual ways.

This year, the 2008 DC Design House will be available for visitors April 19 to May 11 as a fundraiser for Children’s National Medical Center.

On April 26, it will be included in the Georgetown House Tour.

Following the showcase, it will be on the market for $3,995,000.

This free-standing, Federal-style Georgetown home, located at 3014 P St. NW, started as a one-story boys school in 1842. In 1874, a new owner added the second story and current brick facade.

In 2007, Realtors Skip and Debbie Singleton, with DC Living Real Estate, purchased the home and began the process of meticulously rebuilding the residence, as they say, “from the ground up and four walls in.”

Working with the team of Danny Ngo and N.D.T. Construction, and Michael Bruner and Architectural Built-ins, the Singletons restored the original brick facade and windows of the home.

They opted to remove the original staircase and all the walls and floors in order to create a more appealing floor plan, and added a large skylight to bring in more natural light.

The biggest task involved excavating the basement floor to increase the height of the lower-level ceiling, a job that took months and also required underpinning the walls for extra support.

New support required the replacement of many of the home’s original pine beams. Architectural Built-ins sliced the original beams and removed their square nails in order to custom-make the reclaimed yellow pine walls and trim in the new lower-level media room.

Custom cabinets, vanities and closets were built all over the house, with custom moldings, trim and dark pine floors carefully chosen to offer the look and feel of a historic home.

The main level has an elegant entry foyer, a living room with a gas fireplace, silk wallpaper and built-in shelving and a formal dining room with custom wallpaper.

The sunny den has custom French doors that open onto a wood deck. The powder room on this level has a built-in television in the mirror.

The center-island kitchen has a bay window, custom cabinets and a pantry, a Sub-Zero refrigerator, a Bosch dishwasher, a French Lacanche range and a marble farm sink on the island.

Upstairs, the master suite has a custom walk-in closet and spacious limestone bath with a separate tub and shower. Two additional bedrooms on this level each have a private full bath, one of marble and the other limestone. The upper level also has a stacked washer and dryer.

The lower level has the media room with the reclaimed original yellow pine walls, surround sound, a wet bar and beamed ceilings, with a walk-out French door to the south-facing, professionally landscaped garden.

In addition, the lower level has a bedroom or office with a built-in desk, a full limestone bath and a laundry room with a full-size washer and dryer and storage space.

In addition to the extensive custom built-in bookshelves and cabinetry, this residence has halogen lighting, speakers and a central vacuum system throughout the home.

A new roof has been installed, along with energy efficient features such as insulation in the ceiling and parameter walls, restored windows, fresh pointing in the brick facade and dual-zone heating and air conditioning.

For information about the 2008 DC Design House, contact agents/owners Skip and Debbie Singleton at 202/337-0501 or visit www.dcdesignhouse.com.

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