- The Washington Times - Thursday, March 11, 2010

CALIFORNIA

Actor Corey Haim of ‘Lost Boys’ dies

LOS ANGELES | Corey Haim, a 1980s teen heartthrob whose career was blighted by drug abuse, has died. He was 38.

Mr. Haim died early Wednesday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, Los Angeles County coroner’s Lt. Cheryl MacWillie said.

“As he got out of bed, he felt a little weak and went down to the floor on his knees,” Assistant Chief Coroner Ed Winter said. His mother called paramedics.

An autopsy will determine cause of death. There was no evidence of foul play, police Sgt. Michael Kammert said.

Mr. Haim, who gained attention for roles in “Lucas” and “The Lost Boys,” had flulike symptoms before he died and was getting over-the-counter and prescription medications, police Sgt. William Mann said.

Mr. Haim was taken by ambulance to the hospital from an apartment in Los Angeles.

GEORGIA

Claims dismissed in King dispute

ATLANTA | A Georgia judge has dismissed most of the remaining legal claims in a dispute between the children of Martin Luther King, months after the siblings reached a settlement.

A Fulton County judge’s Wednesday order also gives an interim custodian control over the King Center for Nonviolent Change, which has been at the center of a legal feud.

Martin Luther King III, Bernice King and Dexter King had aired their grievances in open court for more than a year. They reached the settlement in October.

Dexter King’s brother and sister sued him in 2008, accusing him of acting improperly as head of their father’s estate, called King Inc. They claimed he shut them out of decisions and refused to hold a shareholders meeting since 2004.

MASSACHUSETTS

State gun-lock requirement upheld

BOSTON | The highest court in Massachusetts on Wednesday upheld the constitutionality of a state law that requires gun owners to lock weapons in their homes, a case closely watched by both gun-control and gun-rights proponents.

Massachusetts prosecutors argued that the law saves lives because it requires guns to be kept in a locked container or equipped with a trigger lock when not under the owner’s control. The Gun Owners’ Action League and the Second Amendment Foundation Inc., however, pointed to a 2008 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that said people have a constitutional right to keep weapons for self-defense.

The state Supreme Judicial Court, ruling in the case of a man charged with improperly storing a hunting rifle in his Billerica home, unanimously agreed that the Second Amendment does not overrule the state’s right to require owners to store guns safely.

NEW JERSEY

Knitter covers town with little sweaters

WEST CAPE MAY | Someone is spinning quite a yarn over one New Jersey shore town.

An unknown person dubbed the Midnight Knitter by West Cape May residents is covering tree branches and lamp poles with little sweaters under cover of darkness.

Mayor Pam Kaithern said police are looking into the guerrilla crocheting, which technically is against the law because it is being done on public property without permission.

The mayor and many residents admit they’re enthralled by the rainbow of colors that has popped up.

Resident Susan Longacre takes a walk each morning in Wilbraham Park, where several tree branches and light poles have gotten the treatment. She thinks it’s great.

Even those who aren’t thrilled admit the yarn is better than spray-painted graffiti.

NEW YORK

Horse breeder guilty of animal cruelty

CATSKILL | Prominent New York thoroughbred breeder and owner Ernie Paragallo was convicted Wednesday of mistreating dozens of malnourished horses on his Hudson Valley farm.

A judge convicted Paragallo of 33 of 34 misdemeanor animal cruelty counts in a nonjury trial in Greene County.

The 52-year-old Long Island resident was charged after state police and animal welfare investigators raided his farm in Coxsackie in April and seized 177 malnourished horses. He could face up to two years in prison and $33,000 in fines, $1,000 for each count.

Most of the horses were eventually adopted by other horse farms around the nation, but several were in such poor shape they had to be euthanized.

Paragallo, who testified last week that he didn’t know the horses on his farm weren’t being fed enough, had no comment as he left court.

Michael Howard, Paragallo’s lawyer, called the verdict disappointing and surprising and said he would appeal the convictions.

VIRGINIA

Bill banning mandated health coverage OK’d

RICHMOND | Virginia’s General Assembly is the first in the nation to approve legislation that bucks federal health care reforms by banning mandatory health insurance coverage.

Without debate, the House of Delegates voted 80-17 Wednesday to accept Senate amendments to a bill that supporters say preserves Virginia’s prerogatives as a state.

Thirty-four other legislatures have filed or proposed similar measures rejecting health insurance mandates.

But Virginia’s legislature, scheduled to adjourn Saturday, is the first to finish work on a bill. The measure goes to Gov. Robert F. McDonnell, a Republican, who plans to sign it.

The measures are advancing nationally as Republicans capitalize on voter discontent over Democrat-backed federal health care reform efforts in Congress.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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