- The Washington Times - Wednesday, January 19, 2011

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Your Jan. 12 editorial “Virginia’s taxing Republicans” is right on the mark (Comment & Analysis). Just when the GOP seems to be gaining back at least some trust of the American people with a pledge to cut spending and keep taxes in check, three Northern Virginia Republicans are continuing to follow the game plan of the early 2000s that nearly killed the party. Everyone knows corporations don’t pay taxes; they collect them from you and me. The fact that Maryland imposes such a tax ought to send a signal to any Virginia legislator to do the opposite.

Instead of working overtime to find something else to tax, the Virginia GOP ought to live up to its pledge to rein in spending and look for places to cut. Virginia’s budget doubled under the two previous spend-and-tax Democratic governors, with lots of help from the spend-and-tax Republican General Assembly.

In addition to leading the fight for the much reviled abuser fees, Delegate David Albo, a Republican, also led the fight against the governor’s plan to get the commonwealth out of the liquor business. Also, according the Virginia Public Access Project, Mr. Albo received almost $68,000 from the construction and real estate industry over the past year. Many of the industry’s firms have lobbied Richmond legislators for higher taxes, ostensibly for roads. Moreover, as chairman of the committee that will redraw the redistricting map, he has made no secret of his intention to gerrymander himself into a safe seat, rendering himself virtually untouchable.

This is why so many people are not yet willing to sign on with the Republican Party. They still see too many examples of Republicans doing the bidding of powerful special interests and reshaping their districts to minimize electoral consequences.

KERRY D. BOLOGNESE

Springfield, Va.

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