- The Washington Times - Thursday, August 8, 2013

Millikin University in Illinois is standing behind a decision to allow an award-winning professor teach at the school this fall, even after learning he had mowed down his entire family with a .22-caliber long-barrel rifle when he was 16.

Dr. James St. James, chair of the university’s Department of Behavioral Sciences, joined the school in 1986, some two decades after he confessed to killing his mother, father and older sister in Texas in 1967, Fox News reported. A jury found him not guilty by reason of insanity and he was released six years later after being treated for paranoid schizophrenia, Fox News said.

Mr. James’ past was first revealed by the Georgetown Advocate, a Texas paper, in a series of articles last month, and the university has chosen to stand behind him.

“Millikin University has only recently been made aware of Dr. James St. James’ past,” a statement read. “Given the traumatic experiences of his childhood, Dr. St. James’ efforts to build his life and obtain a successful professional career have been remarkable. The university expects Dr. St. James to teach at Millikin this fall.”

According to the Georgetown Advocate, Mr. James’ father was the respected head of the biology department at nearby Southwestern University. His mother was a “vivacious” woman originally from South Carolina, and his 17-year-old sister was known for her musical talent.

On Aug. 4, 1967, Mr. James “sniffed some airplane glue ‘to give him a boost’” and then loaded a .22-caliber long-barrel rifle before walking into the living room and shooting all three of them dead.

“He later admitted that he had decided to kill them a week prior and made a plan the night before,” the Georgetown Advocate reported.

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