- The Washington Times - Friday, January 30, 2015

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Unprecedented security measures for the Super Bowl have earned much attention from the press this week, augmented by plenty of outreach from the Department of Homeland Security about strategic safety measures that will be in place in Phoenix on Sunday. They are prepared. So are the organizers. The federal agency says its National Protection and Programs Directorate “conducted an active shooter preparedness workshop, training 150 participants, including members of the Super Bowl Planning Committee.”

Also of note: Augmenting thousands of local law enforcement and first responders plus private security officers in Phoenix: The Secret Service, Transportation Safety Administration, Federal Air Marshals, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, National Biosurveillance Integration Center, Office for Bombing Prevention, National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center plus U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. This is a partial list, incidentally.

Black Hawk helicopters and truck-sized X-ray devices which normally see service along the Texas-Mexico border will also be on hand. In an abundance of caution, even half-time performer Katy Perry’s glitzy dress and porta-potties have been scanned.

And in the wake of “Deflate-Gate,” the 108 footballs that will be associated with this year’s Super Bowl also have some super security, according to NFL officials during a press conference on Thursday. The New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks will each prepare 54 balls for Sunday’s game, then deliver them late Friday to Chicago Bears equipment manager Tony Medlin, who will oversee an independent group of attendants who shepherd the footballs up until game time. Why so many footballs? The Super Bowl cachet, of course. Some come into service for charity events as historic equipment.


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