- The Washington Times - Friday, June 26, 2015

Radio host Glenn Beck said the Supreme Court’s 6-3 decision to uphold Obamacare for a second time is proof “the country as you know it, and as it was designed, is done.”

Mr. Beck’s reaction to the high court’s King v. Burwell decision in many ways mirrors Justice Antonin Scalia’s dissent. 

“Words no longer have meaning if an Exchange that is not established by a State is ‘established by the State,’ ” Justice Scalia said.

The libertarian radio host said that the accumulation of U.S. debt, coupled with a Supreme Court that acts as a legislative instead of a judicial body, will force the country to “reset” in the future.

“The system that our founders put together, which was follow the Constitution and three equal but separate branches of government that each have their own specific role, is over,” Mr Beck said, The Blaze reported Thursday. “It will reset because there’s nothing left of this. So now the question is, when we reset, do we, A, tear each other apart, B, do we go to a new Constitution, or, C, do we hang on and reset to the original Constitution and become much more free and Libertarian in our nature?”

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., writing for the majority, said that the intent of lawmakers who crafted the Affordable Care Act had to taken into account because a strict reading of its wording would render the law untenable.

“The combination of no tax credits and an ineffective coverage requirement could well push a state’s individual insurance market into a death spiral,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote.

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