- - Monday, April 4, 2016

ANALYSIS/OPINION

At the final moment of his radio show that I co-host on Tuesdays, my colleague and friend Armstrong Williams asked, “Do you think Europe is becoming Israel, with its terrorist problem?”

Here’s why my answer was a vigorous “definitely yes!”

History reveals patterns, and one of them is this: When oppression and murder begin by targeting Jews, it ultimately spreads and victimizes everyone else. Jews, it has been observed, are the canaries in the mines.

Coal miners used to bring canaries with them down into the mine tunnels. That way, when deadly gasses, such as carbon monoxide, would begin to build up, the gasses would kill the fragile canaries before affecting the men. The canaries’ deaths were a warning that the mine had become a danger zone, and the miners would have time to get out.

That’s the metaphor, and here’s a modern example of the way it works. Israeli citizens murdered by Palestinian terrorist suicide bombers back in the 1990s were the canaries. Suicide bombings of civilians had never happened before. The world, however, failed to heed the warning and preferred to believe that the scourge of suicide bombing would be limited to Israel. What a deadly error that was! Connect the dots: Today, Islamist suicide bombers kill people everywhere, from Paris to Pakistan, from New York to Nigeria, and from Brussels to Iraq.

Europeans can connect their continent’s dots directly from the targeting of Jews and Jewish sites to the carnage in Paris and Brussels. The trail is as follows. In May 2014 the Jewish Museum of Brussels was targeted. Four people were shot to death by an Islamist terrorist, a man born in France, who returned to Europe after fighting in Syria.

Despite a great deal of evidence to the contrary, Belgium’s deputy prosecutor concluded, “he probably acted alone.”

That was a tragic error. The canaries died, but Belgium ignored the warning. They chose to believe it was only a canary problem.

As we now know, the killer at the Jewish museum was part of a network of similar Islamist European terrorists led by a man named Abaaoud – whose victims the following year were 130 people in Paris.

Oddly, after the Paris bombing, a Belgian authority is reported to have said, “It’s no longer synagogues or the Jewish Museums, it’s mass gatherings and public places.” Are museums and houses of worship not public gathering places? The comment is European code for “Let’s wake up and take it seriously, now that it’s not just dangerous for Jews, but also for the rest of us.”

So, will Europe have Israel’s terrorist problem? Definitely, yes.

Europe’s failure to connect the dots goes back years. In some countries, such as Sweden, media and government colluded to obscure the connections and instead view each violent event as an isolated or random criminal act.

And yet, at the very same time, and while publicly severely critical of Israel’s handling of its terrorism problem, Sweden sent a delegation from the Royal Swedish Academy of War Sciences to Israel to learn from its experiences with security challenges.

Add hypocrisy to political correctness, mix in some incompetence and a cup of willful blindness, and you have the recipe for today’s Europe.

Jews are moving out of Europe in record numbers.

According to the Jewish Agency, the number of immigrants to Israel from Western Europe in 2014 increased by 88 percent over 2013, and was much higher than any number in the previous 20 years. Most came from France and Italy. In the year following the Charlie Hebdo/kosher supermarket attacks, 8,000 Jews from France alone moved to Israel. Because they are such a small minority, and since no statistics are available for those who emigrate to countries other than Israel,  it is hard to measure precisely the decline of European Jewish population; but there can be no doubt that it is declining.

Connect the dots.

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