- Associated Press - Tuesday, October 25, 2016

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - The Latest on the trial of those who occupied a national wildlife refuge in Oregon (all times local):

5:45 p.m.

A federal judge in the trial of those who occupied an Oregon wildlife refuge sent jurors home for the day after finding no indication that a member of the panel was biased.

U.S. District Judge Anna Brown questioned a juror in her chambers Tuesday after receiving a note saying he had mentioned during deliberations that he was “very biased.” The note from a fellow juror asked whether that panel member could still be considered impartial.

Despite finding no sign of bias, Brown is giving defense attorneys until Wednesday to find case law that would support further investigation.

Another note asked whether the jurors must reach verdicts for all seven defendants or if they can reach them for just three. Brown said they must consider each charge for each defendant separately.

The notes indicate the jury is having difficulty reaching a consensus after three days of deliberations.

___

3:45 p.m.

The federal judge overseeing jury deliberations in the trial of Ammon Bundy and others involved in the occupation of an Oregon wildlife refuge is considering how to proceed after one juror submitted a note saying another juror was biased.

U.S. District Court Judge Anna Brown reconvened federal prosecutors and attorneys for the seven defendants Tuesday afternoon after jurors submitted two notes to the judge.

One note said a juror had said in deliberations he was biased. That note questions whether the juror can be considered impartial.

Brown, the prosecutors and defense attorneys are now examining whether there is case law that addresses how to proceed when a question of juror impartiality arises during jury deliberations.

Another note asks whether the jurors must reach verdicts for all seven defendants, or if they can reach verdicts for three defendants.

The notes indicate the jury is having difficulty reaching a consensus. They have deliberated for three days.

___

3:15 p.m.

Jurors who are considering whether to convict Ammon Bundy and his followers for their occupation of a wildlife refuge in Oregon have indicated difficulty in reaching a consensus.

Federal prosecutors and attorneys for the seven defendants were reconvened Tuesday afternoon because of two hand-written notes submitted by jurors to the judge.

OPB reports (https://bit.ly/2ePDxTi) that one note questions the impartiality of one of the jurors. Another note asks whether the jurors need to reach agreement on all seven defendants, or if it can be just three.

Bundy in early 2016 led what turned out to be a 41-day occupation of a national wildlife refuge near Burns, Oregon. He and his co-defendants are charged with conspiring to impede Interior Department employees from doing their duties at the refuge.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide