- Associated Press - Saturday, April 22, 2017

DORTMUND ATTACK

BERLIN (AP) - A 28-year-old German-Russian citizen took out a five-figure loan to bet that Borussia Dortmund shares would drop, then bombed the soccer team’s bus in an attack he tried to disguise as Islamic terrorism in a scheme to net millions, German officials said.

The suspect, identified only as Sergej W. in line with German privacy laws, was arrested by a police tactical team near the southwestern city of Tuebingen, federal prosecutors said.

“We are working on the assumption that the suspect is responsible for the attack against the team bus of Borussia Dortmund,” prosecutors’ spokeswoman Frauke Koehler told a news conference.

She said the man came to the attention of investigators because he had made “suspicious options purchases” for shares in Borussia Dortmund, the only top-league German club listed on the stock exchange, on the same day as the April 11 attack.



BASEBALL

DENVER (AP) - Madison Bumgarner was zooming around on a dirt bike during his team’s day off when he hit a slippery spot and crashed.

The freak accident landed him on the disabled list for the first time in his big league career and left the San Francisco Giants coping with the loss of their ace as they struggle through a rough start.

The left-hander bruised ribs and a sprained a joint in his pitching shoulder from the wipeout that occurred Thursday. The timetable for his return was not announced - a blow for a team that’s last in the NL.

“I think the main thing is you have to be grateful he’s not hurt worse than he is,” Giants catcher Buster Posey said.

Manager Bruce Bochy said that Bumgarner drove himself to the hotel, called team head athletic trainer Dave Groeschner and went to the hospital, where doctors ran tests that included X-rays, an MRI and a CT scan.

PRO BASKETBALL

CHICAGO (AP) - Just when it seemed everything was going right for the Chicago Bulls, Rajon Rondo broke his right thumb.

Then, they lost to the Boston Celtics.

The Bulls announced Rondo was out indefinitely hours before they dropped Game 3, tightening their first-round series after Chicago took the first two at Boston. Rondo’s injury in Game 2 is a big blow for a team trying to become the sixth No. 8 seed to knock off a No. 1.

“Rondo obviously has been unbelievable in the two wins we had in Boston,” coach Fred Hoiberg said. “So to get the news we got last night obviously was very difficult.”

X-rays confirmed the fracture, and surgery is not required. Hoiberg said Rondo - also playing through a right wrist injury - will probably be re-evaluated in a week to 10 days.

Hoiberg said Rondo was injured swiping for the ball in the third quarter of Game 2. He either hit the ball or Boston center Kelly Olynyk’s elbow, but stayed in the game.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Former Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon has settled a lawsuit filed by a woman he punched nearly three years ago, the parties said in a joint statement.

The statement said the two spoke in person, and Amelia Molitor’s lawsuit has been “amicably resolved and dismissed.”

Mixon hopes to be selected in the NFL draft next week. He’s one of the most talented running backs available, but he could drop in the draft because of the incident. He was not invited to the NFL combine, but he posted excellent numbers on his pro day.

Mixon punched Molitor in July 2014 and broke bones in her face. He was suspended from the team for a year after the incident. Last season, he set the school record for all-purpose yardage in a season.

SOCCER

NEW YORK (AP) - North America’s soccer federation has filed a lawsuit claiming it was victimized by two defendants charged in the FIFA bribery scandal.

In papers filed earlier this week in federal court in Brooklyn, the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football accuses former FIFA officials Jack Warner and Chuck Blazer of making a fortune through embezzlement - allegations that mirror those in a sprawling U.S. criminal investigation that has resulted in charges against several top soccer officials.

The suit accuses the pair of negotiating bribes and kickbacks in connection with lucrative broadcasting rights for tournaments including CONCACAF’s Gold Cup championship.

NORTH CAROLINA ACADEMIC PROBE

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey has denied a request seeking his removal as head of the NCAA infractions panel handling North Carolina’s ongoing academic case because of a conflict of interest.

Sankey stated in an April 14 letter obtained by The Associated Press that the panel would “fairly decide this case.”

“The panel, including me, will hear and decide this case based on the case record and the membership’s bylaws,” Sankey wrote to all involved parties.

Elliot Abrams - a Raleigh attorney representing a retired office administrator charged with violations - had written the NCAA saying Sankey had a “personal, professional and institutional interest” in the outcome as SEC commissioner while comparing it to “refereeing a championship game between an (Atlantic Coast Conference) team and an SEC team.”

UNC faces five top-level charges, including lack of institutional control, in the multiyear probe centered on irregular courses in an academic department.

AARON HERNANDEZ DEATH

NEW BEDFORD, Mass. (AP) - A judge ordered key evidence in the prison suicide of Aaron Hernandez preserved, granting a request from the ex-NFL star’s fiancee so the family can investigate the circumstances of his death.

Bristol Superior Court Judge Thomas McGuire’s ruling includes video recordings of Hernandez’s cell for the eight hours before he was found hanged, records of where Hernandez was during that time and all of his property, including his writings. Authorities say he left three notes next to a Bible in his cell.

McGuire’s order also covers recordings of his phone calls for 30 days before his death. But the judge declined to include recordings of other inmates’ phone calls - something that George Leontire, a lawyer for Hernandez’s fiancee, had requested.

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