- The Washington Times - Thursday, December 21, 2017

Mediaite.com has named “Fox & Friends” co-hosts Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, and Brian Kilmeade as the most influential people in the entire print, broadcast and online media realm.

The familiar Fox News trio tops the industry blog’s annual list of 63 other journalists and press personalities who were also under consideration for the honor.

The early morning team earned an accolade from one of their biggest fans.

“Was @foxandfriends just named the most influential show in news? You deserve it — three great people! The many Fake News Hate Shows should study your formula for success!,” President Trump tweeted early Thursday morning.

“The reason Fox & Friends was named the most influential in media is precisely because it is the president’s favorite show: he monitors its episodes obsessively, tweeting out segments and echoing its talking points. Coming from the leader of the free world, that comes with wide-reaching consequences: very often a Fox & Friends segment can set the policy and media narrative for the day,” wrote Mediaite.com analyst Aidan McLaughlin in his rationale of the choice.

There were other famous folks recognized.

In second place on the “most influential” roster: CNN president Jeff Zucker, followed by Fox News host Sean Hannity, online news kingpin Matt Drudge, MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, CNN anchor Jake Tapper, MSNBC hosts Mika Brzezinksi and Joe Scarborough, ABC News moderator George Stephanopoulos, CNN host Chris Cuomo and Fox News host Tucker Carlson. They comprise the top-10.

‘This list recognizes those influential news media figures whose voices and/or power rang out louder this year. That doesn’t mean that all of these people are household names, and on the flip side, there are some very well paid and talented news media figures not on the list. This list is about influence on the debate and discussion. That manifested itself by elevating those with the most access to President Trump as well as those who became his most aggressive critics,” the Mediaite staff explained in their rationale.

Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times is switching its third-party commenting system from Disqus to Spot.IM. You will need to either create an account with Spot.im or if you wish to use your Disqus account look under the Conversation for the link "Have a Disqus Account?". Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide