- Associated Press - Tuesday, February 7, 2017

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - The Latest on the corruption trial of former Utah Attorney General John Swallow (all times local):

10:06 a.m.

A corruption scandal that prosecutors say connected wealthy businessmen and powerful politicians against a backdrop of luxury vacations, gold coins and a surreptitiously recorded meeting at a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop is set to come to a Utah courtroom.


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A nearly monthlong trial beginning with jury selection Tuesday will decide whether former Utah Attorney General John Swallow’s fall from grace will end with a prison sentence. Jury selection is expected to last through the day.

Swallow is charged with 13 counts including bribery and evidence tampering. Investigators said he and predecessor Mark Shurtleff hung a virtual “for sale” sign on the door to Utah’s top law enforcement office, taking campaign donations and gifts like beach vacations from people who’d run afoul of regulators.



Swallow’s attorney says there was no scheme to break laws and the charges are politically motivated.

___

9:33 am.

A corruption scandal that prosecutors say connected wealthy businessmen and powerful politicians against a backdrop of luxury jets, gold coins and a surreptitiously recorded meeting at a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop is set to come to a Utah courtroom.

A nearly monthlong trial beginning with jury selection Tuesday will decide whether former Utah Attorney General John Swallow’s fall from grace will end with a prison sentence.

Swallow is charged with 13 counts including bribery and evidence tampering. Investigators said he and predecessor Mark Shurtleff hung a virtual “for sale” sign on the door to Utah’s top law enforcement office, taking campaign donations and gifts like beach vacations from people who’d run afoul of regulators.

Swallow’s attorney says there was no scheme to break laws and the charges are politically motivated.

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