- The Washington Times - Sunday, July 9, 2017

President Trump’s eldest son said Sunday that there was more to his meeting with a Russian lawyer last year than previously acknowledged, prompting fresh speculation about Trump campaign intrigue with the Kremlin.

In a startling switch, however, Donald Trump Jr. said the lawyer claimed Russia was working to help Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

When the New York Times first reported the meeting Saturday, the younger Mr. Trump issued a statement saying the meeting was focused mainly on a discontinued program for U.S. adoptions of Russian children.

He issued a new statement Sunday, acknowledging the meeting was set up by an acquaintance he knew from the 2013 Miss Universe pageant in Moscow who said the lawyer might have information helpful to the Trump campaign.

The meeting in June 2016 with a lawyer with Kremlin ties, who was later identified as Natalia Veselnitskaya, was also attended by Mr. Trump’s son-in-law and top advisor Jared Kushner and Trump campaign chairman Paul J. Manafort.

The younger Mr. Trump said that during the meeting Ms. Vesenlantskaya claimed to have information that “individuals connected to Russia were funding the Democratic National Committee” and supporting Clinton.

“No details or supporting information was provided or even offered,” the younger Mr. Trump said in a statement. “It quickly became clear that she had no meaningful information.”

He said no details or supporting information was ever offered, and that his father was unaware of the meeting.

Mark Corallo, a spokesman for Trump’s legal team, said the president was “not aware of and did not attend the meeting.”

The younger Mr. Trump had not disclosed the meeting prior to the news report.

Mr. Kushner, who works as a top adviser to the president, later reported the meeting on White House disclosure forms.

The president’s opponents in the U.S. seized on the story as fresh evidence of possible collusion. The FBI has uncovered no evidence of collusion after a yearlong investigation, but they continue, including a Justice Department special counsel probe that began in May.

• This article is based in part on wire service reports.

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