- Associated Press - Wednesday, April 25, 2018

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) - The Latest on a court challenge of vetoes by New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez (all times local):

11:50 a.m.

The New Mexico Supreme Court has ordered that 10 bills vetoed by Gov. Susana Martinez in 2017 go into effect anyway because the governor failed to provide an immediate explanation or her reasoning to lawmakers as required by the state constitution.

The court decision Wednesday resolves a year-long dispute over the extent of the governor’s veto authority. In oral arguments, attorneys for the Democrat-led Legislatures said Martinez made it difficult or impossible to respond to her concerns about proposed legislation or to move forward with an override vote.

A state district court opened the way for the disputed bills became law in September. The vetoed bills sought to expand access to high-speed internet, open the way for industrial hemp research programs and allow high school students to count computer science classes toward core math credits needed for graduation.



The Republican governor previously said the Legislature was overstepping its authority in challenging the vetoes. Attorneys for the governor say lawmakers eventually received written explanations for five of the contested vetoes, leaving enough time to revise the bills or attempt an override vote.

___

3 a.m.

The New Mexico Supreme Court will hear oral arguments as it decides whether vetoes by Gov. Susana Martinez should be invalidated because she allegedly missed deadlines or failed to explain her reasoning.

Leading Democratic lawmakers sought to disqualify 10 vetoes during oral arguments scheduled for Wednesday.

They allege the Republican governor missed a three-day deadline aimed at helping lawmakers respond quickly to early vetoes or never explained the intent of vetoes.

Attorneys for the governor dispute that account of the veto process and say it was fair.

The Supreme Court review leaves in limbo bipartisan legislation that would expand access to high-speed internet, open the way for industrial hemp research programs, and allow high school students to count computer science classes toward core math credits needed for graduation.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Copyright © 2019 The Washington Times, LLC.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide