- The Washington Times - Tuesday, June 12, 2018

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

While the video of the historic smiles and handshakes from Singapore is still running wall-to-wall on cable and broadcast television, it’s a good time to step back and assess how the Trump presidency is measuring up to the dire warnings we’ve heard from Democrats, Never Trumpers and the media since the 2016 campaign. 

From the earliest days of Donald Trump’s unorthodox and unexpected run for the White House, the American people have been told that the man who’d never run for any public office before was an authoritarian. Despite the fact that he’d had a public profile for thirty years and was in America’s living rooms with a top-rated television show, we were assured that this man was racist, sexist and homophobic. 

When he was running against the woman who (we were told) was the most experienced human being to ever seek the presidency, we were told he was a deplorable monster who would end our democracy and roll back civil rights to the Jim Crow era. 

From the moment he won the election (which we were promised would never happen in a million years) we’ve been told he was a puppet of Vladimir Putin and would irrevocably damage our economy while bringing the world to the brink of a nuclear war with North Korea or Iran… or both. 

So now, with the ink drying on a document that was never supposed to be dreamt of. While unemployment reaches historic lows and the economy chugs along at a pace never seen under President Obama.While ISIS picks up the pieces in the devastated landscape they recently called their caliphate and while manufacturing jobs pop up in regions we were assured by all the experts would be rusted-out ghost towns of an era gone by… is it fair to ask ourselves, “Wait a second. What if this man isn’t the second-coming of Hitler?”

Because, that’s what we were told. With histrionic and hyperbolic way “racist” and “authoritarian” and “fascist” was liberally thrown around in analyzing Trump’s style and policies, the 45th President of the United States was set up for an interesting performance standard. All he had to do was not be Hitler, and he’d be ahead of the game. 

For the millions of Americans who took a chance on this man because they were so angry at the political class and so distrustful of a woman they inherently despised but were forced to see as Joan of Arc, the post-election professional political rhetoric was rather terrifying. We were told by the vast majority of experts on cable and broadcast news that we’d just elected Adolph Hitler

Hitler?

We knew he was different. We knew he said things off the cuff that were beyond the norm for every other person who has held that office. But, we made that bargain. We weren’t surprised. It was one of the reasons we voted for him. We really wanted change. 

We didn’t love what he tweeted. We didn’t love that he tweeted at all. We knew his presidency was going to be unorthodox. But… Hitler?

And now, we have what appears to be a historic nuclear disarmament agreement with North Korea that all the experts said could never be done. In fact, we’ve been told it could never be done by the very experts who tried it themselves over the past decades and never apologized for their dismal failures.

Is it possible that the best way to bring an authoritarian regime to its knees and to the negotiation table is to send a fleet of Navy war ships rather than sending Jimmy Carter?

Now we have a burgeoning economy despite Nobel economists telling us we’d all be eating stone soup by now. Now we have the lowest unemployment for African-Americans in our nation’s history, and Kanye and Kim Kardashian West are singing Trump’s praises despite being told blacks in this nation would be suffering in ways unspeakable since reconstruction. 

Now, we have an embassy in Jerusalem in record time and at a record low cost, and the Middle East isn’t exploding in fury as we were promised it would. 

Eighteen months into the Trump presidency, Democrats have been reduced to Bill Maher openly hoping for a devastating economic recession and Nancy Pelosi publicly mocking the fact that people have jobs. Beyond that, they’ve got, literally, nothing. 

So, what if Trump isn’t Hitler? What if he’s an unorthodox, man from the business world who publicly behaves like the crass New Yorker that he is, punches back if he or his supporters are unfairly attacked, and looks at insurmountable challenges in a different way and asks “Why is this insurmountable? Let’s try fixing it a different way.” and he does. 

What if Trump isn’t a fascist? What if he isn’t an authoritarian? What if he isn’t the end of our Democratic Republic? 

All Trump had to do, to defy the majority of experts and analysts who were so disappointed in us for not voting the way they told us to, was not be Hitler. It appears he has succeeded in that task. In fact, it appears that the Trump presidency, as of now, should be viewed as a net positive for this country and her people. 

So, if the experts were wrong about the Republican primary and they were wrong about the election and they were wrong about the presidency, is it fair to finally ask what else they are consistently wrong about? And how is it these experts continue to have the forum on cable and broadcast news to continue to make false predictions? 

If Trump isn’t Hitler, is it possible he’s actually, possibly, unimaginably… a good president? 


Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide