- The Washington Times - Tuesday, April 30, 2019

The House will vote Wednesday on a resolution referring former Trump lawyer-turned nemesis Michael Cohen to the Justice Department for a perjury investigation.

Rep. Mark Green, Tennessee Republican, is forcing the vote, saying Congress’s ability to get truthful answers from witnesses is on the line.

He introduced a privileged resolution Tuesday that, under the rules, must be speedily disposed of — and House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer said it would come up for a vote Wednesday.


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There’s little doubt Cohen did mislead Congress during his high-profile testimony in February when he said he’d “never” sought a pardon from President Trump. He later acknowledged through his lawyer that he had sought a pardon, and that his use of the word “never” didn’t mean never, but only after a certain date.

Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, who had repeatedly warned Cohen about lying, says that later correction is sufficient and he will not pursue perjury charges.



But Republicans say Cohen’s behavior demands more.

Mr. Green read his resolution from the floor of the House Tuesday, listing several other instances of conflicting testimony from Cohen.

For example, federal prosecutors who won guilty pleas from Cohen said they have text messages where he said he expected to get a job in the Trump administration. Cohen vehemently denied he had sought such a job.

For Republicans, that’s a central piece of evidence because they argue Cohen turned against Mr. Trump and began to fabricate stories about him after the job snub.

“The integrity of the Oversight Committee and entire House is at stake,” Mr. Green said.

Cohen was Mr. Trump’s lawyer and personal fixer. He has pleaded guilty to several crimes including making illegal campaign payments on behalf of Mr. Trump when he paid hush money to two pornography stars who alleged affairs with Mr. Trump before he was a political candidate.

Cohen’s February testimony to the House produced more high-octane insults than it did substantive information, but Democrats may be reluctant to refer him for prosecution for perjury for fear of undermining Cohen’s complaints about Mr. Trump.

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