- The Washington Times - Sunday, February 24, 2019

Sen. Elizabeth Warren has one-upped the Democratic 2020 presidential competition by saying she would consider reparations not just for the descendants of slaves, but for Native Americans.

The Massachusetts Democrat had already joined Sen. Kamala Harris, California Democrat, and former San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro in coming out in support of some form of reparations for black Americans without offering details.

Asked Friday if Native Americans should be included in the discussion, the Massachusetts Democrat said, “I think it’s a part of the conversation. It’s an important part of the conversation.”

Her comments came in comments to reporters after a speech at the New Hampshire Democratic Party fundraiser in Manchester, according to the Boston Globe.

Financial reparations to atone for slavery has long been a talking point on the left that few if any top Democrats have supported, including former President Barack Obama and 2016 presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

With a crowded Democratic field undergoing a race to the left, however, the idea of reparations is on the table as an issue in the 2020 presidential primary.

“[W]e must confront the dark history of slavery and government-sanctioned discrimination in this country that has had many consequences, including undermining the ability of black families to build wealth in America for generations,” Ms. Warren said earlier this week in a statement to the New York Times.

In a Feb. 11 interview, Ms. Harris told 105.1 FM in New York City that “America has a history of 200 years of slavery. We had Jim Crow. We had legal segregation in America for a very long time.”

“We have got to recognize, back to that earlier point, people aren’t starting out on the same base in terms of their ability to succeed and so we have got to recognize that and give people a lift up,” said Ms. Harris.

Ms. Warren apologized earlier this month for claiming Cherokee ancestry during her career as a law professor, an issue that has dogged her since her 2012 Senate campaign.

“I’m not a tribal citizen,” she told reporters. “My apology is an apology for not having been more sensitive about tribal citizenship and tribal sovereignty. I really want to underline the point, tribes and only tribes determine tribal citizenship.”

Conservatives and others responded by asking how a reparations plan would work and who would be eligible, details that have yet to be aired by the Democratic candidates.

“This is not about racial equality,” said radio talk-show host Mark Levin on the Conservative Review. “This is about a massive takeover of the private sector, of the individual, of our institutions.”

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