- The Washington Times - Wednesday, June 26, 2019

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Hawaii, on the pen of Democratic Gov. David Ige, is poised to become the ninth state to offer “Gender X” as an option on driver license applications.

And the chaos continues to spread.

Choosing one’s sex has become a bit of a fad of late. And at our peril. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out where this confusion and upset will lead — where this rebellion against God will take us.

If boys aren’t boys and girls aren’t girls, well then — what’s left in this world as an absolute?

“This measure,” said Khara Jabola-Carolus, the executive director of the State Commission on the Status of Women, to Hawaii News Now, “returns us closer to the inclusive society of Native Hawaiians, which celebrated expressions of gender beyond masculinity and femininity.”



What does that even mean?

Regardless, the “Gender X” box on driver’s licenses applications is becoming more and more common. So, too, the practice of allowing parents to mark “undesignated” or “nonbinary” on their newborns’ birth certificates.

“Nonbinary? Intersex? 11 U.S. states issuing third gender IDs,” blared one Reuters headline in January.

In other words: Let the child choose.

“‘Boy or girl?’ Parents raising ‘theybies’ let kids decide,” as NBC put it, in a headline from more than a year ago.

But this is a dangerous path America treads with this “free to be whomever I want to be” attitude with sex. It’s deception, pure and simple. And arrogant — thinking human will can overtake God’s ordinations.

And the experts agree.

“The American College of Pediatricians urges healthcare professionals, educators and legislators to reject all policies that condition children to accept as normal a life of chemical and surgical impersonation of the opposite sex,” the American College of Pediatricians wrote, in September 2017. “Facts — not ideology — determine reality.”

Exactly.

And fact is, neither children nor their caretakers can determine biological sexes.

“Everyone is born with a biological sex,” the American College of Pediatricians wrote. “A person’s belief that he or she is something they are not is, at best, a sign of confused thinking.”

At worst? A sign of a serious psychological and mental disorder, in dire need of treatment.

Either way, government authorities should not be in the business of furthering the confusion, of advancing the psychological ills.

• Cheryl Chumley can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter, @ckchumley.

Sign up for Daily Opinion Newsletter

Copyright © 2019 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide