- - Monday, July 20, 2020

The “cancel culture” is getting out of hand. Some folks insist on getting rid of anything that offends them, with no concern about what might offend others. Who can dispute that Black lives matter? Who can dispute that all lives matter? But what about the organization, Black Lives Matter? Go to its website. Its origins are based partly on two falsehoods: first, that killers of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown were not acting legally in self-defense.

Actually, there was a nationally televised trial which found George Zimmerman not guilty in the Trayvon Martin case, and then Attorney Gen. Eric Holder investigated the Brown case and cleared Officer Darren Wilson. The BLM website’s “What We Believe” section states: “We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.” So, BLM supports the most self-destructive facet of Black culture, fatherless families, which guarantees much higher rates of school dropout, crime, unemployment, incarceration and suicide.

Also, BLM focuses on the unwarranted killing of blacks by police (these are in fact very few and are exaggerated grossly), but ignores the far greater problem of Black-on-Black murders.

Check the FBI website for 2018, which shows that the murder rate for Black-on-white is 12 times that for white-on-Black. LM is pushing to defund police, which is resulting in an explosion of violent crime, disproportionately by Blacks against Blacks. This is anarchy. How is any of this helping Black lives? It’s not. It’s ending them. So apparently only some Black lives matter to BLM — yet BLM signs proliferate at civil rights marches.

Why should non-Blacks not find this organization offensive and want to “cancel” it? And why should they empathize with the civil rights movement when BLM purports to speak for most Black people?



LT. COL. WALT BRINKER

U.S. Army (retired)

Eastover, N.C.

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