- The Washington Times - Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Five quarterbacks. Two teams. So much mediocrity in between. 

The Jacksonville Jaguars are starting veteran Mike Glennon for Sunday’s game against the Cleveland Browns — his first start since 2017. By doing so, the move completes a journey that reflects the sad, depressing state of two franchises that haven’t been able to figure out the quarterback position. 

As pointed out by The Associated Press’ Mark Long, Glennon’s start essentially completes the revolving door at quarterback between the Chicago Bears and the Jaguars. 

See below: 



For further context, Chicago signed Glennon to three-year, $45 million contract in March 2017 — only to draft Mitchell Trubisky a month later. Glennon started four games for the Bears before Trubisky took over. 

Fast forward to 2019, the Jaguars, stuck in quarterback hell, decide to give Nick Foles a four-year, $88 million contract off the heels of Foles leading the Philadelphia Eagles to a Super Bowl victory.

There was only one problem, Foles suffered a shoulder injury in Week 1 — paving the way for sixth-round rookie Gardner Minshew to steal the job. Minshew was younger, better and cheaper, leading the Jaguars to trade Foles this offseason to — you guessed it — Chicago.

With the Bears, Foles failed to beat out Trubisky in training camp, but Trubisky was benched midway through the Bears’ third game due to his struggles.

The Jaguars, meanwhile, were having their own quarterback problems. Minshew broke his thumb, with the team giving a shot to sixth-rounder Jake Luton. Luton, it turns out, was not the answer. That’s why the Jaguars are turning to Glennon, who signed with Jacksonville in May.

The only way this could be more perfect is if the Bears and the Jaguars played each other this season. 

Good news, you’re in luck: The two teams meet in a Week 16 matchup on Dec. 27.

Who will be playing quarterback for those teams by then is anyone’s guess.

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