Economy and Business News - Washington Business and Financial News - Washington Times
Skip to content

Business & Economy

Related Articles

In this Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2018, photo, sprinklers run as a farmworker walks through a broccoli field in Salinas, Calif. Like many California cities, Salinas, dubbed the "Salad Bowl of the World" because the surrounding farmland produces most of the lettuce on Earth, suffers from a lack of available affordable housing and space to build more. Housing prices have exploded, with the median cost of a home now $549,000, according to Zillow. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Farm-rich Salinas exemplifies California's housing struggles

- Associated Press

Middle-school English teacher Maryam Powers doesn't take vacations. To earn additional money, she picks up an extra period of teaching when she can and mentors new hires. But to afford the mortgage on a $330,000 three-bedroom home she purchased in Salinas in 2015, Powers still must rent out the master bedroom for $800 a month.

FILE - In this April 2, 2018, file photo, billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer is interviewed on Cheddar on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Since the U.S. Supreme Court declared that campaign spending is free speech, corporations or nonprofits have had an easier time supporting or denouncing political candidates, leading to massive spending in tight races. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Money talks: Campaigns draw millions in 'outsider' cash

- Associated Press

It's been eight years since the U.S. Supreme Court declared that political spending is free speech. The decision eased the way for corporations, unions or nonprofits to spend massive amounts to support, or more often, denounce candidates in tight races.

President Donald Trump presents the Medal of Honor to U.S. Marines Corps retired Sgt. Maj. John Canley, during an East Room ceremony at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. Canley is the 300th Marine to receive the nation's highest military medal. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Retired Marine receives Medal of Honor for Vietnam actions

- Associated Press

President Donald Trump presented the nation's highest military honor Wednesday to an 80-year-old retired Marine sergeant major who five decades ago "fought with unmatched bravery" at the beginning of one of the Vietnam War's longest and bloodiest battles.

In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., speaks after the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington. With the GOP tax plan contributing to rising federal deficits, Democrats are warning that Republicans will go after cuts to Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security if they control Congress after the midterms. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell opened the door to the campaign year attack when he suggested rising deficits are due to government spending on those programs. The GOP leader has not made budget cuts a priority. But Democrats warn that eventually Republicans will try to cut spending.  (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Dems shift line of attack, warning of GOP threat to Medicare

- Associated Press

With the GOP tax plan contributing to rising federal deficits, Democrats are warning that Republicans will seek cuts to Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security to balance budgets if they keep control of Congress in the November election.

Abbott: 3Q Earnings Snapshot

Associated Press

Abbott Laboratories (ABT) on Wednesday reported third-quarter net income of $563 million.

UK inflation drop eases central bank dilemma ahead of Brexit

- Associated Press

Inflation in Britain eased markedly during September, official figures showed Wednesday, a development that lowers the pressure on the Bank of England to raise interest rates at a time when the country faces acute uncertainty from Brexit.

FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2018, file photo, former Solicitor General Ted Olson testifies on a panel of experts and character witnesses before the Senate Judiciary Committee on behalf of President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on the final day of the confirmation hearings, on Capitol Hill in Washington.  Saudi Arabia is paying influential lobbyists, lawyers and public relations experts nearly $6 million a year to engage U.S. officials and promote the Middle East nation, even after several firms cut ties with the kingdom following the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Among those in Saudi Arabia's corner are a lobbying firm headed by the former Republican chairman of the House Armed Services Committee and high-profile Washington attorney Olson. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Saudis have a $6 million lobbying payroll despite departures

- Associated Press

Saudi Arabia is paying influential lobbyists, lawyers and public relations experts nearly $6 million a year to engage U.S. officials and promote the Middle East nation, even after three Washington firms cut ties with the kingdom following the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.