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European Council President Donald Tusk, right, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban participate in a media conference at the EU Council building in Brussels on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is visiting EU officials on Thursday to discuss the current migration crisis. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

A battle of wills over Polish courts exposes EU bullying

The European Union has long criticized its East European members — the former Soviet satellites Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic — for alleged "authoritarian" tendencies. The George Soros-backed, open-borders policy favored by Western European leaders has long been a sore point between East and West, with East European leaders refusing to admit millions of economic migrants from the Middle East and other world crisis spots whom they see as a threat to their security, culture and identity as a people.

President Donald Trump delivers a statement on the Iran nuclear deal from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Washington. Trump announced the U.S. will pull out of the landmark nuclear accord with Iran, dealing a profound blow to U.S. allies and potentially deepening the president's isolation on the world stage.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump thwarts Dr. Evil

The seething rage coming from Obamaland is palpable -- President Trump has withdrawn from the Iran deal, Barack Obama's signature achievement.

In this Dec. 10, 2009, file photo, people walk in Red Square, with St. Basil Cathedral, left, the Kremlin's Spassky Tower, right back, and Lenin Mausoleum, right, in Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze, File)

Russians fleeing a bad situation

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty reported this week asylum applications by Russian citizens in the United States hit a 24-year high in 2017, jumping nearly 40 percent from the previous year and continuing an upward march that began after Vladimir Putin began his second run as president in 2012.

Vladimir Putin crony Oleg Deripask (right), an aluminum magnate, is pleading with the U.S. Treasury to lift sanctions imposed in April. (Associated Press/File)

For Russia, the hits just keep coming from Team Trump

So now the Democrats have sued the Trump campaign, Russia and WikiLeaks over supposed "collusion" during the 2016 presidential election. But even as President Trump's critics accuse him of going easy on the Kremlin, the hits from the White House toward Moscow just keep on coming.

"President Putin, Russia and Iran are responsible for backing Animal Assad. Big price...to pay. Open area immediately for medical help and verification. Another humanitarian disaster for no reason whatsoever. SICK!" President Trump tweeted. (Associated Press)

Putin needs a war in Syria

Media pundits and the McCain-Lindsey Team are crowing with delight about how President Trump "emboldened" Syrian President Bashar Assad to again deploy chemical weapons against civilians, when POTUS raised the trial balloon of leaving Syria. However, they are missing the real point.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting in the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, the home of the Soviet nuclear weapons program and later Soviet and Russian non-military nuclear technologies, in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, April 10, 2018. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Trump's Syria actions a test of Russia's weapons

Russia doesn't make much, but they do make really good weapons. In fact, one of the purposes of Russian involvement in the civil war in Syria, in addition to preserving Russian influence in the region, was to promote Russian military technology.