W. Scott Lamb — Jesus in the Public Square - Washington Times
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Jesus in the Public Square

W. Scott Lamb

W. Scott Lamb

W. Scott Lamb is an author of biographies, literary agent and Baptist preacher. A native of St. Louis (go Cardinals!), he lives on a Tennessee hill outside of Nashville with his wife and six kids. Readers may email him at wscottlamb@gmail.com.

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(From left to right): Jerry Falwell, Jr.; cover of "Faith in the Halls of Power," by Michael Lindsay; Phyllis Schlafly. Image by Scott Lamb

Let's return to fire-in-the-belly evangelical politics

Evangelical politicians who are "more sophisticated" to the point that their edges are dull need someone to remind them that the end game of going to Congress isn't to be a Congressman. It's to represent their constituents and to act like something more important than their re-election is at stake.

Image used by permission Tony Carnes, editor of the website "A Journey Through NYC Religions" -- (http://www.nycreligion.info/making-postsecular-city-manhattan-evangelicals-part-1/ )

Sixty percent of Manhattan's evangelical churches have started since 1978

- The Washington Times

In contrast to the idea that New York City -- and Manhattan in particular --is a monolithic morass of secularism and near-mothballed Mainline edifices, did you know that seven out of ten Evangelical congregations in Manhattan were started since 1950? And four out of ten were started in the decade after 9/11?

Photograph courtesy of Brian Jump.

Missouri pastor encourages congregants to run for local office

- The Washington Times

We get angry at the world," Jump says, "where the direction is going, what Washington is telling us we have to teach our kids, all of these sorts of things." But as in the case of Jump's two deacons, "if we would win a seat on the local school board, then that board determines the superintendent, curriculum, funding and direction of the school. If every church in America would make sure the majority of the school board were members of their church, the world would be a lot better place."

Chris Hughes (Images courtesy of Chris Hughes. Montage by Scott Lamb)

Better Christian engagement by staying in the trenches and thinking local

Chris Hughes believes Christians who look to make a real difference in the public square need to change their strategy of involvement. Too often, he says, Christians get worked up and busy just a month or two before an election--only to disappear from the trenches after the election. "Somehow, we've got to train these guys and tell these pastors that they need to be involved, but not just when they're in the spotlight," Hughes said. "They need to realize there is always another election, and not leave the process for a few more years until there's another hot issue."

Jim Lembke, a former member of the Missouri House and Senate. (Photos courtesy of Donna Lembke, Jim Lembke's wife)

Jim Lembke and the Christian's call to public service

Due diligence also means not blindly voting for a party. "You can't just vote for the person because they're a Democrat or Republican," Jim Lembke said. "As a Christian, I believe that we are called to be engaged in the process -- to use our minds. The Lord has blessed us with a Republic and that means it's our job to hold on to it -- as one of our Founders stated."

Mark Riggins, a retired school teacher, ran for the Nevada State Assembly in 2016. Though he lost to the 5-time incumbent, he earned his opponent's praise for the vigor and integrity of his campaign.

Mark Riggins and the potential of a second attempt

With the next primary less than a year away, Mark Riggins looks forward to being in the thick of the race once again. And with the solid name recognition he earned in 2016 combined with a lack of an incumbent to defeat, who knows what may happen the second time around?

(image created by W. Scott Lamb)

Reflections on Providence and July 4th, by Doug Stringer

Let us not only greet one another with a "Happy 4th" or "Independence Day, but may we have a deep gratitude and appreciation for those who sacrificed for us to have them. May we also be keenly aware of just how volatile our liberties and freedoms are. They must not be taken for granted, but stewarded with respect and a sense of responsibility -- lest we find ourselves losing the very things we have so cherished.

Pastor Brad Atkins of First Baptist Church of Powdersville, South Carolina.

Does activity in the public square ruin a pastor's ministry?

The way we're going to serve him is by not sitting at home when it's time to get out and be a voice and go vote. We're going to be intelligent and we're going to vote for the candidate that most closely aligns to what we've professed that we believe. And we will encourage other people to do the same.

1990 FBI mugshot of John Gotti (image created by W. Scott Lamb).

Gotti Justice

- The Washington Times

Twenty-five years ago today in a federal courthouse in Brooklyn, former mob boss John Gotti received his sentencing for a laundry list of crimes he had committed. There's no evidence that Gotti turned to God while in prison.

'There's no glory. There's just hard work -- and you have to have a heart.'

In the end, Campbell says it is about being called to servant leadership. "There's no glory. There's just hard work--and you have to have a heart," Campbell said. "And humility! Like Gideon, who said, 'I'm the least of the tribe, and I'm the least of my tribe. Why are you talking to me?' That is a key component of a Christian being involved in the public square."

"Understanding Trump" --the new book by Newt Gingrich

'Understanding Trump' by Newt Gingrich

- The Washington Times

Given that Mr. Gingrich is both a historian with an earned doctorate and also a former Speaker of the House, he brings a unique perspective on any topic he chooses to write on. Combining historical awareness with public policy wonkishness, his prose sounds just like he talks -- which is to say, both interesting and informative. You may disagree with his politics, but Mr. Gingrich won't bore you.

Luis Monge and Timothy McVeigh

Monge, McVeigh, and the morality of capital punishment

- The Washington Times

Press the "never capital punishment" thesis to its Timothy McVeigh or Luis Monge conclusion. Should these two men have been sentenced to live out the remainder of their natural life in prison? No, they should not have--and they didn't.

Louisiana State Representative Beryl Amedee

Once a homeschooling mom, now a Louisiana state representative

Sometimes, being involved could simply mean praying. We're all supposed to do that. Other times it means taking action like showing up at your local government meetings and speaking up. But other times it might mean jumping in and running for a particular office -- especially those offices where the decisions are made.