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With his blond hair, blue eyes and good-natured personality, Fedoruk could pass as the All-American boy if you didn’t know he was from western Canada. Fedoruk was raised in Redwater, Alberta, a small farming community where hockey was the only way for him to escape boredom. He beams as he talks about skating down roads to three rinks created in empty lots for the neighborhood kids. How fathers competed to create the best rink _ his dad affixed lights to metal poles _ so kids could stay outside and play hockey through the winter chill all night long.

As he got older, there were more hazardous ways to pass the time than with a stick and puck.

He remembers being 14 or 15 years old, hanging with a group of older teens when he got drunk for the first time. A shy kid, Fedoruk was suddenly the center of attention. His social fears and anxieties evaporated one sip at a time. His idea of an alcoholic was some bum under a bridge with a brown bag in his hands, not a blossoming hockey star with his eyes on the NHL.

“What booze did for me at that age, I fell in love with it instantly,” Fedoruk said. “What I felt that night stayed with me forever. I had found a new friend. And it was alcohol.”

He could have used a more pious sidekick. Fedoruk’s drinking increased and he spent a night in jail at 19 because of a bar fight directly related to his alcohol consumption.

Fedoruk moved on to harder partying and later nights. His drinking morphed from casual fun to an addiction. That didn’t prevent him from getting drafted. The Flyers made him a seventh-round pick in the 1997 draft.

What drinking did was halt his promotion to the NHL. He was out of control at 20 when the Flyers gave him an ultimatum: Get help or he’d be sent packing.

Fedoruk did what he could to salvage his career and got clean. He checked in to Marworth in Waverly, Pa., for alcohol and chemical dependency treatment. He was admitted for a 28-day stay, but was let out after only 17 days.

Fedoruk always felt like he didn’t fit in and was socially awkward around people. At Marworth, he found answers and ways to cope that didn’t involve hitting the bottle.

For almost six years, he found a new friend in sobriety. He was promoted to Philadelphia and played 53 games as a rookie. He played four seasons with the Flyers, then won a championship with their AHL team during the lockout.

His best years, personally and professionally, were sober. Fedoruk met his wife _ they wed after a Flyers practice _ and had their first had child when he was clean.

He was traded to Anaheim and had the gritty forward career year in 2005-06 with 23 points in 76 games.

And he never refused a fight.

Fedoruk underwent surgery in November 2003 after a fight with Eric Cairns of the New York Islanders left him with a broken face. He was clobbered by New York Rangers enforcer Colton Orr in 2007, caught with a hard right against his reconstructed left cheek that sent him down and out on his back. Surgeons implanted a small, permanent titanium plate in Fedoruk’s upper cheekbone to stabilize the orbital structure.

Fedoruk couldn’t maintain his straight-and-sober lifestyle for much longer.

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