NUGENT: Fighting in the streets

Obama-caused frustrations could soon boil over

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New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg stated that he’s worried that American young people will begin to riot in our streets because of their unemployment.

While the mayor and I disagree on most things, he might be onto to something here.

I recently opined that I couldn’t figure out why America’s young people were not already rioting because of the stacks of debt being foisted on their backs by a government that would rather borrow and spend than live within its means.

Young people are starting to figure out that our president conned them in the last election, claiming that he could fix everything, make the world safer, create jobs, provide for everybody, redistribute earnings, coddle the unemployed, etc. With many college graduates having to move back in with their parents, young people are beginning to understand that the president’s policies are anathema to job creation in the private sector.

I remember the riots of the 1960s over the Vietnam War and race relations. Young people back then were socially aware, on the surface, of the conditions that were impacting their lives. The differences between the protesters of the 1960s and the void of angry young people today are stark.

Where are the protests by today’s unemployed and underemployed young people? Why aren’t they demanding answers to fundamental questions about their future? Why aren’t they yelling that hope and change was a con job? Why aren’t they demanding answers to the reality that their generation will be the first in the history of America not to have a future at least as good as what their parents enjoyed?

Who knows? Maybe they can’t break away from playing computer and video games long enough to look around at their condition and the condition of America. Because of the toxic, liberal education they received, maybe they haven’t figured out how America is supposed to work instead of how our president wants to transform it into something that would inspire our Founding Fathers to call for a second American revolution.

Mr. Bloomberg was right when he said, “The public is not happy. The public knows there is something wrong in this country, and there is. The bottom line is that they’re upset.”

Indeed, the public is upset and has a right to be. The people know something has gone terribly wrong and that they are going to have to pay for it. Quite honestly, I couldn’t blame young people if they began to riot in the streets. I don’t want to see that, but I could understand it.

As the campaign heats up, the president will try to con young people again into believing that he and his fantasy-driven socialist policies will somehow magically create an environment where the economy will improve and jobs will reappear. That’s fascinating considering that neither he nor anyone in his Cabinet has much private-sector experience at producing jack-squat.

Stacks of anti-business regulations have been passed under the Obama administration. Toss in Obamacare, an $825 billion “stimulus,” massive, runaway borrowing and spending, and what the president has created is an environment where private industry would rather sit this guy out than invest in its businesses and grow America.

Meanwhile, unemployment rates are staggering, poverty rates have skyrocketed, millions of American homes are in foreclosure, and the number of Americans on food stamps is at an all-time high.

Young Americans looking to start their lives are learning some cold, hard lessons. Things could get ugly, and I wouldn’t blame them if they began fighting in the streets. The conditions are perfect.

Mr. Bloomberg thinks people will riot because the government isn’t doing enough. That sounds like something the left would do. Meanwhile, the real frustration is felt by those who are convinced the bloated government has become a counterproductive, wasteful monster and needs to be voted out. My kind of riot would be a major victory for responsible candidates in the next election.

Ted Nugent is an American rock ‘n’ roll, sporting and political activist icon. He is the author of “Ted, White, and Blue: The Nugent Manifesto” and “God, Guns & Rock ‘N’ Roll” (Regnery Publishing).

About the Author

Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent is an American rock ‘n’ roll, sporting and political activist icon. He is the author of “Ted, White, and Blue: The Nugent Manifesto” and “God, Guns & Rock ‘N’ Roll” (Regnery Publishing).

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