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The NFLPA also remained critical of Goodell’s decision to punish the players and the process by which he reached his decisions.

“For more than six months, the NFL has ignored the facts, abused the process outlined in our collective bargaining agreement and failed to produce evidence that the players intended to injure anyone, ever,” the said in a written statement. “The only evidence that exists is the League’s gross violation of fair due process, transparency and impartiality during this process. Truth and fairness have been the casualties of the league’s refusal to admit that it might have made a mistake.”

The players initially declined to meet with Goodell before he made his initial disciplinary rulings in early May or during the first appeal process that lasted until the first week of the regular season.

Goodell began to reconsider his disciplinary actions after the Sept. 7 appeal panel ruling and this time all four players agreed to meet with him. During those meetings the NFL produced sworn declarations by Williams and another former defensive assistant, Mike Cerullo, in which they stated that they observed Vilma offering what they believed were $10,000 rewards for knocking then-Arizona quarterback Kurt Warner and then-Minnesota quarterback Brett Favre out of 2009-10 playoff games.

Ginsberg, however, said Cerullo’s and Williams‘ sworn statements are not credible because they conflict with one another. Ginsberg noted that Cerullo swore he gave Vilma’s $10,000 to Williams after the Warner bounty was not “earned,” while Williams swore he never received money from Cerullo. Ginsberg also said the commissioner ignored the sworn testimony in federal court of several current and former teammates who denied the league’s accusations against Vilma.

“Commissioner Goodell has further damaged Jonathan’s reputation, compromised his career, and cast an unfair cloud over a fine and decent man,” Ginsberg said. “It is unfortunate that the process exhibited by the NFL has had no decency.”

While Ginsberg did not immediately say whether he would take the matter back to federal court, Vilma has indicated he would be inclined to do so. U.S. District Judge Ginger Berrigan has stated that she found the NFL’s disciplinary process unfair and that she would be inclined to grant Vilma at least a temporary restraining order if she believed she had jurisdiction on the matter.

However, Berrigan also has stated that she is hesitant to rule until she is certain the players have exhausted all possible remedies available to them through the NFL’s collective bargaining agreement.

The other three players have been represented by the NFLPA, which stated it will carefully review Goodell’s latest decision and “protect our players’ rights with vigilance,” but did not disclose any immediate plans to take the matter back to court.