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The students, alumni and fans outside the stadium were nearly unanimous in their stance that Paterno received a raw deal and the university should have dug in and fought back against the NCAA sanctions. Indeed, they’ve united behind the program following strict NCAA sanctions including a four-year bowl ban.

“We’re maybe more determined than ever to be supportive,” Mike Bealla, of Harrisburg, Pa., said. “If you’re a fan, you’re a fan. The spirit will be there.”

About 90 minutes before kickoff, a plane flew over Beaver Stadium with a banner reading “Oust Erickson/Trustees,” referring to Penn State president Rodney Erickson. But through it all, good behavior ruled the day. In fact, State College police reported no incidents.

The weather was tough for some, though. With temperatures topping out around 90 degrees, there were some fans who required heat-related aid, according to the school’s department of public information.

On the field, of course, the players donned their new jerseys, complete with names on the back. That was O'Brien’s call, tinkering with the classic look in order to recognize the players who stuck with the program amid the scandal. It’s always been about family at Penn State, and so it’s no surprise that Karen Caldwell, the wife of equipment manager, Brad “Spider” Caldwell, stitched the names on the jerseys.

A blue ribbon was also placed on the back of helmets to show support for child abuse victims.

“Sweet Caroline,” the Neil Diamond classic, was scrapped for rock music blasted at ear-ringing decibels that would have made Paterno cringe. In fact, as the Nittany Lions took the field for warm-ups, “Thunderstruck” by AC/DC was the song of choice.

Atmosphere and positivity aside, there were still scores of empty seats and rows deep into the game, which is unusual for an opener. The announced crowd was 97,186. Beaver Stadium seats 106,572, and last year, the Nittany Lions averaged 105,231.

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Dan Gelston can be followed at http://twitter.com/apgelston

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AP writer Mark Scolforo and freelance writers Christina Gallagher, Mike Still and Andy Elder contributed to this report.