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Buffalo Sabres goalie Ryan Miller said Fehr is doing a far better job communicating with members than leadership did in the last lockout. Miller believes that he and his fellow players are more in the loop about what is going on than the 30 league owners, who are prohibited by NHL bylaws from publicly commenting about the negotiation process.

“I doubt that all the owners are as well informed as all the players,” Miller said. “I don’t know if that’s going to get me in trouble or not. I just feel like it’s kind of whatever they are told by Gary. I guess it’s a little bit like politics. Some people can’t watch Fox News because they think it’s all spun to the right, and some people can’t watch MSNBC because it’s spun to the left.

“You have this whole thing where I’m sure they feel like a lot of what we’re saying is spin.”

Players struck in April 1992, causing 30 games to be postponed.

This would be the third lockout under Bettman. The 1994-95 lockout ended after 103 days and the cancellation of 468 games. The most recent lockout was finally settled in July 2005 _ 301 days into the work stoppage and a month after the league would usually have awarded the Stanley Cup.

“You get a real sense of the unity and the commitment and the participation and the understanding and the knowledge that these players have,” Fehr said. “It’s very gratifying.

“The players very much want to reach an agreement, provided that it is one which is fair and which is equitable and treats them appropriately.”

Bettman said the union has controlled the scheduling of the meetings and suggested players had reasons for wanting to delay negotiations. The league tried to start talks last summer, at last winter’s All-Star game, during the playoffs last spring and again at the Stanley Cup finals.

“Looking back in hindsight, it looks like there was no urgency on the part of the players’ association to engage or get anything done,” Bettman said. “It’s happened over the summer. I can’t and won’t speculate as to why that would be their intention, but it is what it is. If you look at the record and you look at it in hindsight, I think it is crystal clear.”

Annual industry revenue has grown from $2.1 billion to $3.3 billion under the expiring deal. Owners asked players to cut their share of hockey related revenue during a six-year proposal. Players are concerned management hasn’t addressed the league’s problems by re-examining the teams’ revenue-sharing formula.

The owners’ latest offer raised the percentage of hockey related revenue given to players from the previous proposal of 46 percent. Initially, the NHL sought to drop the number from the current 57 percent to 43 percent.

Having made several big concessions to make a deal in 2005, the union doesn’t think it should have to make more this time after a period of record financial growth.

“We believe that what we proposed is in the right direction,” Crosby said. “If you look at both, they’re definitely different, but if you have a non-biased opinion, you look at the facts. I think our mindset and the direction we’re going is one that seems like it’s a little bit more fair for both sides.”

Bettman cited the on-ice success for teams, noting that there have been seven different champions over the course of this contract, and all clubs but the Toronto Maple Leafs qualified for the playoffs at least once.

The average player salary also jumped from $1.45 million to $2.55 million over the course of the current agreement.

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