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“It’s not a gigantic number,” Calhoun said of the 99. “Ultimately, our goal is zero. Is that realistic? I don’t know if zero is. But I know any time you involve an ejection, we’re going to see that number go down drastically immediately.”

If the penalty occurs in the first half, the player would be ejected for the remainder of the game. If the penalty occurs in the second half or overtime, the player is ejected for the remainder of the game and the first half of the next game.

The rule would allow for the ejection portion of the penalty to be reviewed through video replay. The replay official must have conclusive evidence that the penalized player didn’t intentionally target a defenseless player in order to overturn the call on the field. Calhoun said the 15-yard portion of the penalty would not be reviewable.

Rhule was a college assistant from 1998-2011 before spending 2012 working for Tom Coughlin with the Giants. He returned to Temple, where he worked under Al Golden for five years, to lead the program in December.

He’d like to see college football take the NFL’s approach. Throw a flag during the game, but when it comes to sitting a player down, let that decision be made later by an impartial panel, away from the pressures of a game.

The NFL also allows players to appeal suspensions and fine.

Ravens star safety Ed Reed was suspended for a game by the NFL this season for repeated hits to the head and neck area of defenseless players. On appeal, that was overturned.

“We should always err on the side of safety,” he said. “But what is the mechanism for after the fact, if a penalty happens in the first half, and a young man sits out and his team loses? Then they go back and look at it and they determine it wasn’t an illegal hit. There was no intent to target the head. What are they then going to do?”

Rhule said suspending a player after a thorough review accomplishes the same thing as ejecting him, but removes the uncertainty that comes with a difficult call.

“I would love to see have the same punishment,” Rhule said, “but after the fact.”

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AP Sports Writer Eric Olson contributed to this report.