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“I’ll have a better answer for you after the game. I’ve never been through this before. This is all new.”

And oh-so-new for the QBs, Flacco and Colin Kaepernick.

Flacco is no fluke, holding the career record for road playoff wins with six. But until outplaying Peyton Manning and Tom Brady this year, he hadn’t gotten the Ravens to the Super Bowl. He has eight touchdown passes and no interceptions in the postseason, padding a resume that soon will make him one very highly paid quarterback: Flacco’s contract expires after this game. Even with a franchise tag applied by Baltimore (13-6), he’ll make about $14.6 million next season.

“I think when you talk about winning as quarterbacks in the playoffs,” Flacco said, “I would think that all of them have Super Bowl victories. So that’s really the only one that matters, and that’s what we’re trying to get.”

Naturally, so are the 49ers (13-4-1), whose midseason adoption of the pistol offense to best use Kaepernick’s dynamic versatility added a dimension no one has been able to stop. The Niners might never have taken such a huge step had incumbent Alex Smith, in the midst of his best season, not sustained a concussion on Nov. 11. Kaepernick took over and the offense took off.

Once Smith was healthy, he no longer was the starter. Jim Harbaugh gambled by sticking with the raw second-year quarterback who brought more game-breaking skills to the position.

Difficult decisions like that are sometimes foolhardy, sometimes inspired.

This one worked superbly, and Kaepernick stands one victory from joining Joe Montana and Steve Young as a 49er Super Bowl champion.

“It was tough watching this team do well and not being able to contribute,” said Kaepernick, more recognized before his promotion for his collection of tattoos than for his strong arm and sprinter’s speed. “For me, what kept me going was the fact that I might get an opportunity to get out there. When I did, I needed to take advantage of it.”

The 49ers hope to take advantage in the same Superdome where they were at their most dominant, beating Denver 55-10 in 1990 in the biggest rout the Super Bowl has seen.

The Steelers are recognized as the true powerhouse of the Super Bowl era, which is nearly a half-century old. Four of those titles came in the 1970s, with Mean Joe Greene and the Steel Curtain shutting down opponents while Terry Bradshaw, Franco Harris and Lynn Swann were scoring on them.

But the last two were in 2005 and 2008, and they’ve been perennial playoff qualifiers, too. That kept them in the football forefront.

For the 49ers the golden years of Montana, Rice, Young and Ronnie Lott ended with the 1994 season. They didn’t even make the playoffs from 2003-10, and this is their first trip back to the Super Bowl.

Rice sees Super Bowl win No. 6 coming Sunday.

“I just think we had players who played well in the big game,” he said. “My best football that I played, I think, happened in the playoffs and in the Super Bowl. I think it’s the same with these players.”

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