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There also are travel and hotel considerations because the game is played at a neutral site, attracting thousands of visitors to the host city.

Most importantly, there are health and safety concerns. Making teams play a Thursday night game after one on Sunday has been heavily criticized by the players’ union. A quick turnaround, such as finishing the Super Bowl on Monday, could be dangerous.

Plus, there are competitive balance decisions to weigh. What might be fair to one team could be a hindrance for another.

Several major sports, including the NFL, have dealt with emergencies that forced schedule changes. Just last year, the Daytona 500 was moved from Sunday afternoon to Monday night because of rain. But NASCAR often is forced to move races due to bad weather.

Same with golf tournaments, and if the USGA’s major events are not won on Sunday, they end the next day with an 18-hole playoff.

Baseball, of course, is vulnerable to rainouts, too.

In the 2008 World Series, Game 5 at Philadelphia was stopped in the sixth inning because of rain with the Phillies and Tampa Bay tied at 2. The storms stuck around, and when play resumed two days later, the Phillies won the game and clinched the championship.

In the 1989 World Series, an earthquake rattled Candlestick Park minutes before the San Francisco Giants were set to host Oakland in Game 3. The Series resumed 10 days later, and the Athletics won twice to complete a sweep.

In 1988, the NHL dealt with a blackout very similar to what happened in the Superdome on Sunday night.

Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals between the Bruins and Oilers in Boston was tied 3-3 in the second period. Edmonton led the series 3-0.

A power outage eventually forced cancellation of the game, and the teams headed back to Edmonton for the next game, as previously scheduled. The Oilers completed their sweep 6-3 at home.

The other matchup that compares to the Super Bowl is the World Cup final at the end of the monthlong soccer tournament. FIFA has provisions for a replay, but in the era of penalty-kick shootouts, that won’t happen _ unless there are extenuating circumstances.

Such as a power failure.

So FIFA demands that local organizers to ensure that every stadium has an emergency independent power generator.

The NFL requires its stadiums to comply with all applicable local building codes and laws, which normally require the kind of backup system the Superdome has.

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