Fresh Start: Reid and Chiefs agree to 5-year deal

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Reid was fired by Lurie on Monday.

Long considered one of the NFL’s bright offensive minds, Reid had a record of 130-93-1 in Philadelphia. He took a team that was 3-13 the year before his arrival and, in the space of only two years, finished 11-5 and second in the NFC East. That began a stretch of five straight years in which Reid won at least 11 games, including one trip to the Super Bowl.

During his tenure, the Eagles made nine playoff appearances while Kansas City made three, and won 10 playoff games _ Kansas City hasn’t won any since 1993. Meanwhile, the Chiefs went through five head coaches and are now on their third in three years.

One of Hunt’s priorities was to find a coach who would bring stability to the franchise.

That’s a big reason why Hunt decided to change the Chiefs’ organizational structure, with the coach and general manager now reporting directly to him. Since his late father Lamar Hunt founded the team 53 years ago, the coach typically reported to the general manager.

That was the way it was under Pioli, whose two coaching hires ended badly.

That alone wasn’t enough to force Pioli out, though. It was a combination of poor draft choices, ineffective free-agent moves and a growing fan rebellion that led the Chiefs to issue a statement Friday that said they had “mutually parted ways” with their general manager.

“There is no way to overstate the level of respect and admiration I have for Scott on a personal level,” Hunt said in the statement. “His character, loyalty, integrity and commitment to a team are extraordinary, and throughout the last four years, he has consistently put the best interests of the Chiefs ahead of his own.”

Still, those qualities failed to translate to success.

Most of the Chiefs’ top stars were drafted by Pioli’s predecessor, Carl Peterson. The former Patriots executive struggled to find impact players, particularly at quarterback, while cycling through coaches and fostering a climate of dread within the entire organization.

Numerous longtime staff members were fired upon Pioli’s arrival, and his inability to connect with fans resulted in unprecedented unrest. Some of the fans even paid for multiple banners to be towed behind planes before home games asking that he be fired.

On Dec. 1, linebacker Jovan Belcher shot the mother of his 3-month-old daughter, Kasandra Perkins, at a home not far from Arrowhead Stadium. Belcher then drove to the team’s practice facility and shot himself in the head as Pioli and Crennel watched in the parking lot.

Pioli hasn’t spoken publicly since the incident.

“The bottom line is that I did not accomplish all of what I set out to do,” Pioli said in a statement released through by team. “To the Hunt family _ to the great fans of Kansas City _ to the players, all employees and alumni, I truly apologize for not getting the job done.”

The three-time NFL executive of the year often spoke of putting together “the right 53,” but he failed to do so, and now it falls on Reid and his staff to finish the job.

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