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Newly minted Ebola czar Ron Klain's appointment may be more politically than medically motivated, according to a longtime associate of Mr. Klain's. (Associated Press/Revolution)

Ebola Czar Day One: Mr. Klain's debut

- The Washington Times

Political point man or medical manager? That is the persistent question for Ron Klain, who officially begins his tenure as the nation's "Ebola response coordinator" on Wednesday.

Monica Lewinsky has emerged as a columnist, public speaker and a social media wrangler who attracted 34,000 followers upon registering with Twitter on Monday. (Associated Press)

Monica Lewinsky to America: 'Here we go'

- The Washington Times

She has become a media presence. That would be Monica Lewinsky, who has shed her previous public identity as the White House intern who had a dalliance with former President Clinton in favor of a 41-year-old with serious press credentials. She is now a columnist for Vanity Fair, a public speaker and a social media wrangler. Miss Lewinsky joined Twitter on Monday and secured 34,000 followers in the space of three hours

President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, on Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014. Obama attend two fundraising events in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

Back to normal: White House fundraising begins again

- The Washington Times

It took the Ebola crisis to dampen White House enthusiasm for relentless fundraising. After a previous week filled with six moneymakers around the nation, President Obama canceled three similar events this week to tend the growing public distress over the disease and its threat. But prudence, perhaps, has ended.

Independent U.S. Senate candidate Greg Orman is giving Sen. Pat Roberts, Kansas Republican, a run for his money, but tea party activists say Mr. Orman is "independent" in name only and the Mr. Roberts is the conservative choice. (Associated Press)

Greg Orman: 'Independent' in name only

- The Washington Times

Election drama in Kansas continues. The bout between incumbent Republican Sen. Pat Roberts and independent hopeful Greg Orman grows intense with news that Democrats are in serious wooing mode, seeking to attract the partyless challenger into their fold.

President Barack Obama waves as he steps out of Air Force One upon arriving at JFK International Airport in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. The president is in New York to attend fundraisers.  (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Message to Congress: Come back, get to work, vote on ISIS

- The Washington Times

Maybe lawmakers figure that their favorability ratings are just so low that nothing much matters anymore. They are wrong. Voters want them back in the U.S. Capitol acting like responsible elected officials. Nearly four out of five Americans — 78 percent — say House and Senate members should return to Washington for a vote to authorize the use of military force against Islamic State fighters in Syria and Iraq. Return now. Please. So says a Reason-Rupe poll, which also reveals a little something about the voters themselves.

Host Jon Stewart is seen here Oct. 18, 2012, during a taping of "The Daily Show with John Stewart" in New York. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Ebola anxiety: Ben Carson warned the nation two months ago

- The Washington Times

A serious case of Ebola anxiety is upon us: analysts spout statistics, the press is swollen with alarming coverage, pollsters are diagnosing public distress and Comedy Central host John Stewart saw fit to dump hand sanitizer all over his script on a recent broadcast

Secret Service Director Julia Pierson testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, before the House Oversight Committee as it examines details surrounding a security breach at the White House when a man climbed over a fence, sprinted across the north lawn and dash deep into the executive mansion before finally being subdued.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Journalists jump at the novelty of a Secret Service probe

- The Washington Times

Bored with the midterm horse races, the press frolicked through a real novelty: raking a clandestine group over the coals. Their inspiration was the bipartisan investigation of a White House security breach conducted by nine Democrats and eight Republicans, all members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, and all with much on their minds.

FILE - In this April 17, 2014, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at White House in Washington. The Obama administration celebrated when sign-ups for the health care law crossed the 8-million mark after a stumbling start. But most Americans are unimpressed. A new Associated Press-GfK poll finds that public opinion remains deeply negative. One bright spot: Most of those who signed up say premiums are about what they expected, or lower. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

$5,242 a minute: White House fundraising continues

- The Washington Times

Yes, there are numbers to justify why Republicans get cranky about President Obama's frequent fundraising for the Democratic Party, particularly when tax payer dollars facilitate glittering events. We know that Mr. Obama has hosted almost 400 political fundraisers since taking office. We also know that Air Force One costs $228,288 an hour to operate, a factor when the West Coast is involved. Like the upcoming gala in the Hollywood home of Gwyneth Paltrow in early October - which marks the 19th time the president has journeyed to Los Angeles for some campaign cash.

In this Aug. 10, 2014, photo, an aircraft for missions targeting the Islamic State group in Iraq lands at the USS George H.W. Bush in the Persian Gulf. Combined U.S.-Arab airstrikes at the heart of the Islamic State group's military strongholds in Syria achieved their strategic aim of showing the extremists that their savage attacks will not go unanswered, the top American military officer said Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

The 'O-Word'? Wary Democrats omit President Obama from their press releases

- The Washington Times

When the president of the United States makes a bold move that resonates with the public, the lawmakers within the president's party normally respond with a cascade of celebratory press releases and sound bites. That was not the case for President Obama when he ordered airstrikes on Syria earlier this week. Many Democrats remained on the sidelines in the aftermath — dithering over the proper response to Mr. Obama's sudden switch to commander-in-chief mode.