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Faith at Work: Economic Flourishing, Freedom to Create and Innovate

Faith at Work: Economic Flourishing, Freedom to Create and Innovate is a Special Report prepared by The Washington Times Advocacy Department and Institute for Faith, Work & Economics.

Recent Stories

Are there economic implications in the Creation story?

We do not believe that the Bible explicitly endorses capitalism or any other economic system. Yet the Bible has much to say about economic principles, and as Christians, we should embrace its wisdom as we make economic choices in our everyday lives. It should also lead us to embrace systems that are more closely in alignment with the principles expressed in the Scriptures.

Tim Scott

'If you are the problem, you are also the promise'

God, faith and the power of prayer are truly remarkable. My unwavering relationship with our Heavenly Father has kept me going during my lowest of lows, and has emboldened my hope of brighter days ahead.

'Devotion to high purpose' undergirds success

The promise of religion has much more to do with the next world than with this one. None of the great religions can be pursued seriously except upon this view. They also promise benefits in this world.

5 'incredible innovations' that combat poverty

I remember the first time I saw real poverty. It was the early 1970s, so I would have been 7 or 8 years old. Flipping through a copy of National Geographic magazine, I found a heartbreaking photo. It showed a malnourished African boy, about my own age, with flies on his face and a distended belly.

The case for faith and a free market

This powerful expression of freedom was written in recognition that we are accountable to God and that rights are given to man from God, not by government -- that no temporal power can exercise authority over the individual's conscience or aspirations.

Invention and discovery generate wealth

At the beginning of the 19th century, only duchesses wore silk stockings; by the end, even working girls did. At the beginning of that century, few had eyeglasses; by the end, eyeglasses were in frequent use. Dental care advanced somewhat (much more so, however, in the 20th century). Longevity rose steadily, and infant mortality began to decline (again, much more so in the 20th century).

12 theses for a Christian understanding of economics

Regrettably, many American Christians know little about economics. Furthermore, many Christians assume that the Bible has nothing at all to say about economics. But a biblical worldview actually has a great deal to teach us about economic matters. The meaning of work, the value of labor and other economic issues are all part of the biblical worldview. At the same time, we must recognize that the Christian worldview does not demand or promote a particular economic system.

Human flourishing: An urgent, universal, timeless goal

In the early 21st century, there are few ideas that can be identified as universal. Few ideas span multiple disciplines of human knowledge, from philosophy to economics, from religion to world health policies, from ethics to psychoanalysis, from medical practice to jurisprudence, from trade policies to energy management to music performance, from water treatment to watercolor instruction.

Dr. Jay W. Richards

Shelving the 'Greed Myth' and other economic illusions

Since 1990 extreme poverty has been cut in half worldwide and is continuing to plummet. The Brookings Institution projects that this kind of poverty might more or less disappear by 2030. Globally, infant mortality, malnutrition and illiteracy are all declining.

Economic freedom, opportunity ease poverty

The poor will always be with us, but such a sobering reality does not free us from an obligation to work to alleviate the ravages of poverty. On the contrary, Jesus' statement only serves to remind us that every generation will face the question of how best to fulfill our holy obligations to them.

C. S. Lewis on selfishness vs. self-interest

John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods, claims business is under attack today. Speaking to the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce in February, he said, "Humanity has been lifted up by business, and yet it has been completely hijacked by its enemies who create a narrative that business is selfish and greedy and exploitative."

What I didn't learn in business school

Armed with Stanford undergraduate and MBA degrees and a fairly new Christian faith, I founded a business in the mid-1970s with $5,000 and a grocery bag of computer connector parts. Inmac started on the idea of selling computer accessories by mail order and expanded from there.

Trusting God, not government, for upward mobility

Presidential candidates, elections and even political parties come and go, but one issue has forever been, and will continue to be, at the forefront of a majority of American minds: the economy and jobs. Even as the ethnic face of America has evolved from one generation to the next, this constant has always been with us. In fact, a Gallup poll taken this year confirmed this again.

Defending the free market

Why not socialism? A right use of freedom has tended to encourage human dignity, creativity and flourishing.

Foundation for Economic Education

Why not socialism?

"A man who chooses between drinking a glass of milk and a glass of a solution of potassium cyanide does not choose between two beverages; he chooses between life and death," wrote Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises. "A society that chooses between capitalism and socialism does not choose between two social systems; it chooses between social cooperation and the disintegration of society."

Acting on the 'God moments'

As the plane began its descent into the Los Angeles airport, I saw thick columns of smoke billowing up from the city. That day in 1992, the Los Angeles riots opened my eyes and heart to the needs of my community. As the overseer of 50 churches in the area, I was haunted by questions about the strife that had overtaken my city: "Why is the city on fire? Where is the salt and light?"

Ismael Hernandez, 56, is shown in portrait Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016 at the church he attends, St. Raphael Catholic Church in Lehigh Acres, Fla. Hernandez is the Executive Director of the Freedom & Virtue Institute, a faith-based nonprofit, working with churches and schools, aimed at teaching those in need to become self-sufficient. "I didn't like what I was seeing  people standing in line getting free stuff. That's not the way you feed the poor," Hernandez said. "You may get stuff today but your children will still be in need. There is a better way in getting out of poverty." (Corey Perrine/For World Magazine)

Why I am no longer a socialist

He stood proudly laughing as I retrieved my red flag from a ditch. "Wave it, son!" he encouraged.

Does Acts 2-5 teach socialism?

"A truly strange thing has happened to American Christianity," says a writer at The Washington Post's On Faith blog.

Faith, economic freedom and innovation in the Latin world

Between 2010 and 2012, the Latin World Evangelical Alliance, or Confraternidad Evangelica Latina (ConEL), conducted a survey of 7,169 leaders of the evangelical church in seven countries of the Latin world.

Profits and an 'economy of mutuality'

Money is often seen as intrinsically bad or perhaps a necessary evil in the world. However, we must not forget the important role money plays in wealth creation and in facilitating the efficient exchange of goods and services.

'Mankind is our business'

In December 2005, I sat with my wife in a small Chicago theater watching a charming production of Dickens' "A Christmas Carol."

Aiming at abundant lives -- and livelihoods

As the second-generation owner of a commercial construction company near Washington, D.C., I have explored the driving force behind my work. I prayed for a vision and landed on this: Use your influence to create environments where people can experience abundant life.

Leveraging the workplace for greater good

On the Feb. 13, 2015 episode of ABC-TV's "Shark Tank," my friend, Liz Bohannon, and her husband, Ben, presented their Ugandan-based footwear company -- Sseko Designs -- to the famous board of billionaire investors.

Popcorn and lemonade sales point Detroit to fiscal health

I have had the privilege of being born, raised and shaped by Detroit. Seeing the world through the lens of this beautiful but broken city has framed my view of human flourishing in ways that are truly amazing and counterintuitive.