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Homeland & Cybersecurity

The latest coverage of the Department of Homeland Security and cyber threats around the globe.

FILE -  In this Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014 file photo, the parents of Sahra Ali Mehenni : Kamel Ali Mehenni, right, and  Severine Ali Mehenni, looks at photos of their daughter in their living room in Lezignan Corbieres, southern France. At age 17, Sahra Ali Mehenni went so far as to ask her mother to get her a passport, saying she wanted her paperwork in order before she reached adulthood. When she left for Syria on March 11, departing from the Marseille airport just as the teen boy did, she took her burgundy-bound passport and nobody stopped her before she boarded the flight to Istanbul. (AP Photo/Fred Scheiber, File)

For teen with passport, Syria trip can be seamless

By Lori Hinnant - Associated Press

The teenage sisters told their father they were staying home sick from their suburban Denver school. Instead, they took $2,000 and their passports and headed off for Syria with a 16-year-old friend. They made it as far as Germany before border guards detained them for questioning. Published October 23, 2014

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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2014, file photo, Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, pose in protective suits in an isolation room, in the Emergency Room of the hospital, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients in New York. A doctor who recently returned to New York City from West Africa is being tested for the Ebola virus. The doctor had a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms and was taken Thursday to Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

N.Y. and N.J. say they will require Ebola quarantines

- Associated Press

The governors of New Jersey and New York said Friday they are ordering a mandatory, 21-day quarantine for all doctors and other travelers who have had contact with Ebola victims in West Africa.

FILE - This file photo released Friday, April 19, 2013 by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. At least 1,000 people will be summoned and asked to fill out questionnaires for Tsarnaev's jury in the trial, a federal judge said during a status hearing Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. Tsarnaev is charged with carrying out the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He has pleaded not guilty to 30 federal charges and could face the death penalty if convicted. Jury selection is scheduled to begin Jan. 5. (AP Photo/Federal Bureau of Investigation, File)

Marathon suspect's lawyers again cite media leaks

- Associated Press

Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev are complaining for a third time about media leaks they say are jeopardizing his right to a fair trial.

FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2010 file photo, a student uses an Apple MacBook laptop in his class in Palo Alto, Calif. New warnings are emerging of a security flaw known as the "Bash" bug, which cyber experts say may pose a serious threat to computers and other devices using Unix-based operating systems such as Linux and Mac OS X. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

Associated Press

An Estonian man accused of orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

A police officer guards the National War Memorial in Ottawa, Ontario, on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014. Canadians are mourning the loss of Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, the army reservist who was shot dead as he stood guard before the Tomb of the Unknown soldier on Wednesday. Flags were flown at half-staff to honor Cirillo, a 24-year-old a reservist from Hamilton, Ontario, whose shooting on Wednesday began an attack that ended with a lone gunman storming into Parliament and opening fire before being shot dead himself. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Adrian Wyld)

Gunman in Canada attack complained about mosque

- Associated Press

The gunman who shot and killed a soldier in plain daylight then stormed Canada's Parliament once complained that Vancouver mosque he attended was too liberal and inclusive, Muslim leaders said Friday.

War Loot: Islamic State militants rummage through a cache of weapons airdropped by U.S.-led coalition forces. The weapons were meant to supply Kurdish forces battling the extremist group in Kobani, Syria, but "now they are spoils for the mujahedeen," one militant said. (Associated Press)

Islamic State among 'best-funded' terrorist groups on earth: Treasury Dept.

- The Washington Times

With the exception of a handful of state-sponsored militant groups, the Islamic State is likely the "best-funded terrorist organization" Washington has ever confronted, raising roughly $1 million a day from black market oil sales, $20 million in ransoms over the past year and millions a month through extortion rackets in Syria and Iraq, the Treasury Department's top official tracking terrorist financing said Thursday.

An Ottawa police officer runs with his weapon drawn outside Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday Oct. 22, 2014.  A soldier standing guard at the National War Memorial was shot by an unknown gunman and people reported hearing gunfire inside the halls of Parliament. Prime Minister Stephen Harper was rushed away from Parliament Hill to an undisclosed location, according to officials. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Sean Kilpatrick)

Terror in Canada: Parliament shooter reportedly a recent convert to Islam

- The Washington Times

A gunman who reportedly was a recent convert to Islam launched an attack Wednesday in Ottawa, killing one soldier guarding a war memorial before barging into the capital city's Parliament amid a hail of gunfire and spawning increased vigilance in Washington and Ottawa, where officials wondered how he managed to get into the government building armed.

A New York City cop stands watch in Times Square. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

NYC practices response to nuclear explosion

- Associated Press

The voice over the speakers at New York City's emergency command center calmly stated the unthinkable: a nuclear explosion had gone off in Times Square.

In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, Robel Phillipos, a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, arrives at federal court to attend his trial in Boston. Closing arguments are being held in the case Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Phillipos is charged with lying to the FBI about being in Tsarnaev's dorm room while two other friends removed a backpack containing fireworks and other potential evidence several days after the April 15, 2013 attack. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

Jury to decide if Tsarnaev friend was liar or high

- Associated Press

A friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev told a string of lies to investigators, a prosecutor told a jury Tuesday, but a defense lawyer said the defendant was a frightened 19-year-old who couldn't remember certain details because he had smoked marijuana for at least 12 hours straight.

Recent Opinion Columns

James Clapper          T.J. Kirkpatrick/The Washington Times

Throwing Clapper under the bus

When President Obama attributed the rise in Iraq of the Islamic State, or ISIS, to the failures of the U.S. intelligence community earlier this week, naming and blaming directly National Intelligence Director James R. Clapper, he was attempting to deflect criticism of his own incompetence.