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Victor Davis Hanson

Articles by Victor Davis Hanson

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year's presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump's favor. Published September 20, 2017

Visitors watch the North side from the unification observatory in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. South Korea said Wednesday it conducted its first live-fire drill for an advanced air-launched cruise missile it says will strengthen its pre-emptive strike capability against North Korea in the event of crisis. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

What if South Korea acted like North Korea?

Think of the Korean Peninsula turned upside down. Imagine if there were a South Korean dictatorship that had been in power, as a client of the United States since 1953. Published September 13, 2017

Illustration on government agency deception by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beware of narratives and misinformation

U.S. intelligence agencies said Russia was responsible for hacking Democratic National Committee (DNC) email accounts, leading to the publication of about 20,000 stolen emails on WikiLeaks. Published September 6, 2017

Illustration on the self-destructiveness of the left by Alexandwer Hunter/The Washington Times

When the mob attacks innocent words

"The Bard," William Shakespeare, had a healthy distrust of the sort of mob hysteria typified by our current epidemic of statue-busting and name-changing. Published August 30, 2017

The progressive war against the dead

Much of the country has demanded the elimination of references to, and images of, people of the past -- from Christopher Columbus to Robert E. Lee -- who do not meet our evolving standards of probity. Published August 23, 2017

Illustration on the extreme income gap developing in California by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Is California cracking up?

Corporate profits at California-based transnational corporations such as Apple, Facebook and Google are hitting record highs. Published August 9, 2017

Illustration on the American melting pot by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

This American melting pot

The startling 2016 presidential election weakened the notion of tribal identity rather than a shared American identity. And it may have begun a return to the old idea of unhyphenated Americans. Published August 2, 2017

D.C. Shooting Gallery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's circular firing squad

The American political system has never quite seen anything like the current opposition to President Trump and his unusual reaction to it. Published July 26, 2017

Illustration of Vladimir Putin by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putin's playthings

About a year ago, Donald Trump Jr. met with a mysterious Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. Mr. Trump Jr. was purportedly eager to receive information that could damage Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign. Published July 19, 2017

Closer to the Korean Showdown Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dwindling options for preventing North Korean nuclear weapons

When North Korea eventually builds a missile capable of reaching the U.S. mainland, it will double down on its well-known shakedown of feigning indifference to American deterrence while promising to take out Los Angeles, San Francisco or Seattle unless massive aid is delivered to Pyongyang. Published July 12, 2017

Illustration on the unwise course of Democrats in their attacks on President Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The progressive boomerang

The progressive strategy of investigating President Trump nonstop for Russian collusion or obstruction of justice or witness tampering so far has produced no substantial evidence of wrongdoing. Published June 28, 2017

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Trump and his generals

Donald Trump earned respect from the Washington establishment for appointing three of the nation's most accomplished generals to direct his national security policy: James Mattis (secretary of defense), H.R. McMaster (national security adviser) and John Kelly (secretary of homeland security). Published June 21, 2017

Illustration on political divisiveness and its effect on the nation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can a divided America survive?

The United States is currently the world's oldest democracy. But America is no more immune from collapse than were some of history's most stable and impressive consensual governments. Published June 14, 2017

Mr. Nunes went to Washington

Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican., the now-controversial chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, is a bit different from what Washington expects in its politicians. Published June 8, 2017

Illustration on German attitudes to peace in Europe and with America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The old German problem

Germans do not seem too friendly to Americans these days. According to a recent Harvard Kennedy School study of global media, 98 percent of German public television news portrays President Trump negatively, making it by far the most anti-Trump media in the world. Published May 31, 2017

Illustration on the failures of globalism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Globalism gone off the rails

The West that birthed globalization is now in an open revolt over its own offspring, from here in Eastern Europe to southern Ohio. Published May 24, 2017

Illustration marking the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Battle of Midway

Seventy-five years ago (June 4-7, 1942), the astonishing American victory at the Battle of Midway changed the course of the Pacific War. Published May 17, 2017

Illustration on remodeling the GOP by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Can Trump remodel the Republican Party?

Without Donald Trump's populist and nationalist 2016 campaign, the Republican Party likely would not have won the presidency. Nor would Republicans now enjoy such lopsided control of state legislatures and governorships, as well as majorities in the House and Senate, and likely control of the Supreme Court for a generation. Published May 10, 2017

Potemkin universities

College campuses still appear superficially to be quiet, well-landscaped refuges from the bustle of real life. Published May 3, 2017