Topic - Commerce Committee

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    A congressional committee is investigating the way General Motors and a federal safety agency handled a deadly ignition switch problem in compact cars.

  • Conn. seeks to spur 'social benefit' businesses

    Connecticut is trying again to rework state law allowing business owners to organize companies using alternative business models that seek social change rather than focusing solely on boosting profit.

  • Report: FDA wanted to close Mass pharmacy in 2002

    More than a decade ago, federal health inspectors wanted to shut down the pharmacy linked to a recent deadly meningitis outbreak until it cleaned up its operations, according to congressional investigators.

  • Report: FDA wanted to close Mass pharmacy in 2003

    Nearly a decade ago, federal health inspectors wanted to shut down the pharmacy linked to a recent deadly meningitis outbreak until it cleaned up its operations, according to congressional investigators.

  • **FILE** Federal agents investigate the offices of New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass., on Oct. 16, 2012. The company's steroid medication has been linked to a deadly meningitis outbreak. (Associated Press/The Boston Globe, Barry Chin)

    Report: FDA wanted to close Mass. pharmacy in 2002

    More than a decade ago, federal health inspectors wanted to shut down the pharmacy linked to a recent deadly meningitis outbreak until it cleaned up its operations, according to congressional investigators.

  • President Obama talks June 8, 2012, about the economy at the White House in Washington. (Associated Press)

    GOP releases memo on deal with drug firms

    House Republicans last week released their second investigative memo detailing how the White House worked with the nation's drug companies to sell President Obama's health care law, arguing the deals he struck violate his campaign pledges of transparency.

  • **FILE** The empty parking lot of bankrupt solar energy company Solyndra is seen in Fremont, Calif., on Sept. 16, 2011. (Associated Press)

    Solyndra inquirers call for testimony of lawyers

    If there is one fact that government witnesses testifying before Congress on the failed half-billion-dollar loans to bankrupt Solyndra LLC have made clear, it is that they have not passed the bar exam.

  • A worker leaves with a moving box Wednesday at Solyndra in Fremont, Calif. The solar-panel manufacturer, which received a $535 million loan from the U.S. government, has announced layoffs of 1,100 workers and plans to file for bankruptcy. A weak economy and strong overseas competition have proved insurmountable. (Associated Press)

    Solyndra executives now planning to invoke the 5th

    Executives at bankrupt Solyndra, which collapsed last month after receiving more than a half-billion dollars in federal loans, plan to refuse to testify in a congressional hearing Friday now that the FBI is investigating the company.

  • LENDER: Jonathan Silver, head of the Energy Department program that approved the $535 million deal for Solyndra in 2009, faced some of the toughest questioning Wednesday by a House investigations subcommittee. (T.J. Kirkpatrick/The Washington Times)

    Administration grilled on Solyndra loan

    Obama administration officials refused to say Wednesday whether anybody would be fired over the decision to award solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra LLC a half-billion dollars in loans before it went bankrupt and saw its headquarters raided by the FBI.

  • Illustration: Chairman Upton by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

    CHESSER: All lights on Upton

    As four Republican congressmen - including ranking member but term-limited Rep. Joe Barton of Texas - maneuvered to position themselves to win the chairmanship of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, at least three of the contenders showed they don't understand what it means to get government out of our lives.

  • Illustration: Capitol cleanup by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

    BARTON: Ten ways to start cleaning up the mess

    The final months of George W. Bush's presidency saw an emboldened Democratic Congress set out, as one pundit put it, to "blacken the skies with subpoenas." The party rained enough furious oversight down on the outgoing administration that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi bragged to the Public Broadcasting Service about how "many people have resigned from the executive branch because they've gotten a call from Congress to come in and testify."

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