Topic - Hamid Karzai

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  • Afghan Election Soldiers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    CHELLANEY: Lingering too long in Afghanistan

    Afghanistan's presidential election will mark the first peaceful transition of power in the history of that unfortunate country.

  • An Afghan police officer stands guard as Afghan election workers, right, note serial numbers of ballot boxes at a warehouse of the Independent Elections Commission warehouse in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, April 6, 2014. Trucks and donkeys loaded with ballot boxes made their way to counting centers on Sunday as Afghans and the international community sighed with relief that national elections were held without major violence despite a Taliban threat. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)

    Afghan candidates promise to respect results

    Trucks and donkeys loaded with ballot boxes made their way to counting centers on Sunday as Afghans and the international community sighed with relief that national elections were held without major violence despite a Taliban threat.

  • An Afghan policeman walks around as workers of the election commission office arrange ballot boxes in Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday. Across Afghanistan, voters turned out in droves Saturday to cast ballots in a crucial presidential election. The vote will decide who will replace President Hamid Karzai, who is barred constitutionally from seeking a third term. Partial results are expected as soon as Sunday. (Associated Press)

    Leadership in Karzai's shadow: Afghanistan's next president to win vote, not total control

    Hamid Karzai's name was not on the ballot in Saturday's elections, but the outgoing president of Afghanistan is expected to remain a key political player, possibly complicating the U.S. relationship with his successor.

  • Afghan burqa-clad woman casts her vote at a polling station in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, April 5, 2014. Afghans flocked to polling stations nationwide on Saturday, defying a threat of violence by the Taliban to cast ballots in what promises to be the nation's first democratic transfer of power. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)

    Afghans defy Taliban threat to vote in droves

    Millions of Afghans defied Taliban threats and rain Saturday, underscoring their enormous expectations from an election that comes as the country's wobbly government prepares to face down a ferocious insurgency largely on its own.

  • Afghan youth, Rahmatuallah Siddiqui, 16, stands inside his grocery store, decorated with posters of presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, April 2, 2014. Rahmatuallah hopes that candidate Abdullah will win the elections, for the best of the country.  (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

    Afghan election could reset US-Kabul relations

    Afghanistan's presidential election on Saturday gives the U.S. a new chance to fix relations with Kabul, which are in deep discord after more than 12 years of war and repeated fallings-out between the White House and Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

  • New Voices: Afghan women line up for voter registration cards this week. On Saturday, a segment of society that was oppressed under Taliban rule will help elect their country's next president. Cultural barriers will keep women from voting in some rural areas. (Associated Press photographs)

    Voters in Afghanistan prepare for first democratic transition; vote set for Saturday

    Amid Taliban threats of violence, Afghans will vote Saturday for a new president in an election that not only will begin their country's first democratic transition of power but also may provide clarity about how many U.S. and foreign troops will remain in their war-torn nation after this year.

  • ** FILE ** In this Wednesday, April 13, 2005, file picture, then-U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, left, and Afghan President Hamid Karzai give a news conference in Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Tomas Munita, File)

    Donald Rumsfeld slams Obama on Afghanistan: 'Trained ape' could do better

    Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld sure didn't mince words this week when he slammed President Obama and his administration for their handling of Afghanistan: A "trained ape" could do better, he said.

  • US senator wants decision on Afghan troop levels

    A U.S. senator leading a bipartisan delegation to Afghanistan called on President Barack Obama Saturday to announce a decision on his plans for future troop levels in the country on the assumption a much-delayed security pact eventually will be signed with Kabul.

  • Families of three fallen Navy SEALs are suing Afghan President Hamid Karzai, his security forces and Iran. The lawsuit accuses Mr. Karzai of accepting bribes for the deaths of U.S. servicemen and of leaking details of a SEAL mission to the Taliban. (Associated Press)

    Families sue Karzai, Iran for '11 chopper shootdown

    Three U.S. families filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his security forces, accusing them of betraying their sons in the Aug. 6, 2011, helicopter shootdown that killed 30 Americans, 17 of them Navy SEALs.

  • A CH-47 Chinook helicopter, like this one used for training, was shot down by the Taliban in Afghanistan, killing all aboard. A special-operations officer questions the use of the craft for such "hot-LZ" purposes. (U.S. Navy photograph via Associated Press)

    Families sue Karzai, Afghan security forces for downing of U.S. helicopter in 2011

    Three U.S. families filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his security forces, accusing them of betraying their sons in a 2011 helicopter shoot-down that killed 30 Americans.

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014 file photo, Afghanistan presidential election candidate and former Defense Minister Abdul Rahim Wardak listens during the first presidential election debate at the Tolo TV building, a private TV station, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Wardak, a longtime defense minister until he was removed by parliament in a vote of no confidence in 2012, gave no reason for his withdrawal and he was not throwing his support behind any remaining candidates, he said Sunday, March 16. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini, File)

    Ex-defense minister drops out of Afghan race

    Afghanistan's former defense minister became the second presidential hopeful to withdraw from the race on Sunday, leaving a field of nine candidates three weeks before the vote to replace Hamid Karzai.

  • Afghan President Hamid Karzai speaks during his final address to parliament during its opening session at the parliament house in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, March 15, 2014. Karzai said the last 12 years of war were "imposed" on Afghans, a reference to the U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

    Karzai: Afghanistan doesn't need U.S. troops

    In his final address to Afghanistan's parliament Saturday, President Hamid Karzai told the United States its soldiers can leave at the end of the year because his military, which already protects 93 percent of the country, was ready to take over entirely.

  • Afghan President Hamid Karzai, center, leaves after attending the funeral procession of Afghanistan's influential Vice President Mohammad Qasim Fahim in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Fahim, a leading commander in the alliance that fought the Taliban who was later accused with other warlords of targeting civilian areas during the country's civil war, died on Sunday, March 9, 2014. He was 57. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

    Existing Afghan deal would cover US post-2014

    President Barack Obama has threatened to withdraw all American forces from Afghanistan if a new security agreement is not signed by the end of the year, but there is no legal reason the U.S. has to resort to the "zero option," as administration officials have repeatedly claimed.

  • Supporters of Afghan Vice President Mohammad Qasim Fahim attach poster with his image on a wall in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, March, 9 2014. Afghan Vice President Mohammad Qasim Fahim, a leading commander in the alliance that fought the Taliban who was later accused with other warlords of targeting civilian areas during the bloody conflict, died Sunday. He was 57. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)

    Afghan VP, ex-Northern alliance commander, dies

    Afghanistan's influential Vice President Mohammad Qasim Fahim, a leading commander in the alliance that fought the Taliban who was later accused with other warlords of targeting civilian areas during the country's civil war, died Sunday. He was 57.

  • Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa, right, and Afghan President Hamid Karzai walk together during an official reception for Karzai in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, March 6, 2014. Karzai is on a three-day official visit to Sri Lanka. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

    NATO airstrike kills 5 Afghan soldiers

    An early morning NATO airstrike in Afghanistan's eastern Logar province killed five Afghan soldiers on Thursday, defense ministry officials said. The coalition said the deaths were an accident and expressed its condolences.

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