Topic - Hun Sen

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  • Cambodian opposition chief undaunted by threats

    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — The head of Cambodia's opposition party vowed Sunday not to give up anti-government protests despite violent police crackdowns and threats of legal action against him and his colleagues.

  • Cambodian Buddhist monks run together with supporters of Cambodian National Rescue Party from a rally site of the Democracy Square in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014.   Cambodian police have pushed out about 1,000 anti-government demonstrators from a park in the capital Phnom Penh, a day after four people were killed in a crackdown on a labor protest. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)

    Cambodian police disperse protesters from park

    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Cambodian police on Saturday dispersed about 1,000 anti-government demonstrators from a park in the capital, Phnom Penh, a day after four people were killed in a crackdown on a labor protest.

  • A villager checks a body after the man was shot dead, as riot polices opened fire on garment workers near a factory on the Stung Meanchey complex at the outskirt of  Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014. A police official says at least three people are dead and several wounded after police in Cambodia opened fire Friday to break up a labor protest by striking garment workers.  (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)

    4 dead after Cambodian police fire on protesters

    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — At least four people were killed Friday when police outside Cambodia's capital opened fire to break up a protest by striking garment workers demanding a doubling of the minimum wage, police and human rights workers said.

  • Hun Sen shows knack for staying in power

    President Obama arrived in Cambodia on Monday having just won four more years in office, but that is nothing compared with his host, Hun Sen.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama and Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi shake hands after speaking to the media at her residence in Yangon, Myanmar, Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. Obama who touched down Monday morning, becoming the first U.S. president to visit the Asian nation also known as Burma, said his historic visit to Myanmar marks the next step in a new chapter between the two countries. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama in Cambodia after rousing Myanmar welcome

    Making history twice within hours, President Barack Obama on Monday became the first U.S. president to set foot in Cambodia, a country once known for its Khmer Rouge "killing fields." He left behind flag-waving crowds on the streets of Myanmar, the once internationally shunned nation now showing democratic promise.

  • President Obama (fourth from left) waves as he stands with ASEAN leaders for a group photo during the ASEAN-U.S. leaders' meeting at the Peace Palace in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on Nov. 19, 2012. They are (from left) Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung, Obama, Cambodia's Prime Minister Hun Sen, Brunei's Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah, Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and Laos Prime Minister Thongsing Thammavong. (Associated Press)

    Obama presses Cambodian rights

    President Obama made history twice Monday by becoming the first sitting U.S. president to set foot in Myanmar and Cambodia, two Southeast Asian countries known for their legacy of human rights abuses and government oppression, one showing signs of the progress and the other still a troubling concern.

  • A phoenixlike float with the casket carrying the body of former Cambodian King Norodom Sihanouk arrives at the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, as mourners lining the streets pay their respects on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    Cambodians line streets to see ex-King Norodom Sihanouk's coffin

    The body of Cambodia's late King Norodom Sihanouk returned to his homeland Wednesday afternoon, welcomed by hundreds of thousands of mourners who packed tree-lined roads in the Southeast Asian nation's capital ahead of the royal funeral.

  • ** FILE ** Cambodia's King Norodom Sihanouk (left) introduces his son and successor, King Norodom Sihamoni, upon their arrival at Phnom Penh airport in Cambodia in 2004. (AP Photo/Andy Eames)

    Former Cambodian King Norodom Sihanouk dies at 89

    Norodom Sihanouk, the revered and often mercurial former king and independence hero who helped navigate Cambodia through a half-century of war, genocide and upheaval, died Monday in Beijing. He was 89.

  • Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen (right) talks with Thein Sein, Myanmar's president, in Phnom Penh on Monday before the welcome dinner ahead of the 20th ASEAN Summit slated for Tuesday and Wednesday in Cambodia. (Associated Press)

    Southeast Asian nations seek EU-like bloc

    PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA | New differences could undercut attempts by Southeast Asian countries and China to forge a pact aimed at preventing territorial conflicts from erupting into violence, diplomats said Tuesday at the start of a regional meeting.

  • Cambodia's 11th-century Preah Vihear temple is seen in Preah Vihear province, about 150 miles north of Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital, in July 2010. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)

    Clashes resume along disputed Thai-Cambodian border

    Cambodia called for U.N. peacekeepers to help end the fighting along its tense border with Thailand, where artillery fire echoed for a fourth day Monday near an 11th-century temple classified as a World Heritage Site.

  • Cambodian police officers stand behind a barricade at the site where people stampeded during a water festival in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2010. Thousands of people stampeded during the festival in the Cambodian capital, leaving more than 300 dead and scores injured in what the prime minister called the country's biggest tragedy since the 1970s reign of terror by the Khmer Rouge. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)

    Cambodia mourns as stampede toll rises to 378

    Rescuers trawled a muddy river Tuesday for more bodies and Cambodia prepared for a day of mourning following a stampede by thousands of festival-goers that left at least 378 dead and hundreds injured.

  • People are pushed onto a bridge Monday, the last day of a water festival in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. At least 339 died in the panic. (Associated Press)

    339 killed in stampede at Cambodian festival

    Thousands of people stampeded during a festival in the Cambodian capital Monday night, leaving at least 339 dead and hundreds injured in what the prime minister called the country's biggest tragedy since the 1970s reign of terror by the Khmer Rouge.

  • World Scene

    Cambodia wrote to the United Nations on Sunday in an escalating war of words over a border spat with Thailand, saying it was ready to defend its territory.

  • Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot ruled from 1975 to 1979, when about 1.7 million people perished through hunger, disease or executions.  The entire modern history of modern Cambodia, including the "killing fields" era, has been expunged from classrooms, leaving a knowledge gap  for the new generation.

    Textbook opens young eyes to Cambodian past

    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia

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