Topic - Joaquin Phoenix

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  • In this Friday, May 9, 2014 photo, screenwriter-director, James Gray, left, and actor Joaquin Phoenix from the film, "The Immigrant," pose for a portrait during an interview in Los Angeles.  The movie opens in the U.S. with a limited release on May 16, 2014. (Photo by Katy Winn/Invision/AP)

    Joaquin Phoenix, James Gray reteam for 'Immigrant'

    In James Gray's "The Immigrant," a dismal tale of survival in 1920s New York, Joaquin Phoenix shifts through a gallery of identities, from savior to cad to pitiful loner. His performance - often improvised with co-star Marion Cotillard - is masterfully layered, though his character wasn't initially written that way.

  • This image released by The Weinstein Company shows Joaquin Phoenix, left, and Marion Cotillard in a scene from "The Immigrant." (AP Photo/The Weinstein Company, Anne Joyce)

    Review: 'The Immigrant' a somber masterpiece

    Floating in past a misty Statue of Liberty, James Gray's "The Immigrant" somberly gathers its majesty as a metaphor-rich story of passage and survival. It's an old tale told with rare precision, channeling grand themes into an intimate melodrama.

  • Actress Meryl Streep arrives at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola for the private funeral of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman Friday, Feb. 7, 2014, in New York. Hoffman, 46, was found dead Sunday of an apparent heroin overdose. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

    Hollywood stars turn out to mourn at Philip Seymour Hoffman funeral

    Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, Ethan Hawke, Brian Dennehey, Amy Adams and Ellen Burstyn were among the stars who paid their respects Friday at a private funeral for Philip Seymour Hoffman that combined sadness and humor to honor an actor widely considered among the best of his generation.

  • Joaquin Phoenix in the movie "Her."

    FIELDS: Love by the byte

    The New Year explodes with dire prophesies for men and women and their mating patterns. If they're correct, or even close to it, the lot of men will not be a happy one — or for the women who love them (and want one of their own).

  • FILE - This file image provided by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Joaquin Phoenix in a scene from "Her." In “Her,” Spike Jonze’s futuristic exploration of a man’s relationship with his computer, the filmmaker surveys human disjunction. (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures, File)

    MOVIE REVIEW: 'Her'

    How often do you check your mobile phone each day? For many Americans, the act is now an instinct as much conscious decision. That notion is central to the high-concept premise of "Her," which cleverly posits a near future in which basically normal people have meaningful relationships with self-aware operating systems.

  • SHOW BITS: A tribute to the losers

    Show Bits brings you the 85th annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles through the eyes of Associated Press journalists. Follow them on Twitter where available with the handles listed after each item.

  • JOAQUIN PHOENIX: THE GUY CAN MOVE

    Joaquin Phoenix didn't waste any time getting into the Dolby Theatre, and the Oscar-nominated actor's dash across the red carpet didn't go unnoticed.

  • AP critics pick the year's best movies

    The top 10 films of 2012, according to AP Movie Critic Christy Lemire:

  • Abe, 'Argo,' 'Les Mis' jockey for Oscar attention

    Hollywood is in its usual hazy head space when it comes to the Academy Awards race.

  • He's still here: Phoenix rises again with 'Master'

    Joaquin Phoenix looked as though he'd lost it, coming completely unglued with his film "I'm Still Here," in which he chronicles his supposed move into rap music after announcing his retirement from acting.

  • Review: Anderson's gorgeous, challenging `Master'

    Viewers hoping for a juicy expose of the super-secretive Church of Scientology in "The Master" might want to adjust their expectations just a tad.

  • Jury: Venice rules kept 'Master' from top prize

    Jurors at the Venice Film Festival loved "The Master," a film inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, but strict rules kept them from giving it the top Golden Lion prize along with the other awards it garnered.

  • South Korean film 'Pieta' wins Venice top prize

    South Korean director Kim Ki-duk's drama "Pieta," the brutal story of a debt collector who cripples those who can't pay until he meets a woman who claims to be his mother, won the Golden Lion for best film at the 69th Venice Film Festival on Saturday.

  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt (front) and Paul Dano co-star in a scene from the thriller "Looper." In its 37th year, the Toronto International Film Festival opens Thursday with the big Hollywood action film, a sci-fi tale also starring Bruce Willis and Emily Blunt. (Sony Pictures Entertainment)

    Toronto film festival claims title of cinema’s vox populi

    Sundance is the festival for low-budget filmmaking. Cannes and Venice are glitzy industry showplaces. The Toronto International Film Festival is both of those and everything in between, but mostly, it's a place for ordinary cinema lovers to see a lot of great movies.

  • Toronto film fest goes into action with 'Looper'

    Sundance is the festival for low-budget filmmaking. Cannes and Venice are glitzy industry showplaces. The Toronto International Film Festival is both of those and everything in between, but mostly, it's a place for ordinary cinema lovers to see a lot of great movies.

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