Topic - National Association Of Realtors

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  • Mortgage Q&A: Optimism tempered by experience

    The National Association of Realtors (NAR) has reported that existing-home sales nationally increased 4.3 percent in January from the previous month. The new annualized rate increased to 4.57 million. (According to the NAR, the annual rate for any month represents what the total number of sales for a year would be if the pace for that month were maintained for 12 consecutive months.)

  • Cover story: Best Realtor clicks personally and online

    Getting ready for the change in seasons? That hint of springtime freshness in the air can have even the most jaded homeowner ready to pull down those heavy winter curtains, brighten up the paint and maybe even change those old butcher-block countertops for brand-new granite.

  • Cover story: Just browsing or ready to buy, there's an app

    The days when homebuyers flipped through a magazine of homes for sale, peering at a small black-and-white photo to see whether a property appealed to them, are long gone.

  • Kelley and Ed Postal negotiate with a salesman at a Nissan dealership in Ann Arbor, Mich. Much of the rise in durable goods in February came from the purchases of new cars.

    Tax cut, more income let consumers boost spending in February

    Americans earned a little more and spent a little more in February, thanks to a tax cut. But a big part of the extra money went to cover higher gas prices.

  • Mortgage Q&A: First-time buyers lose to investors

    I read a very interesting article about home sales last week in my local newspaper. Frankly, I was taken aback by the gloomy picture it painted. Here's a summary.

  • Cover story: Fewer sellers going do-it-yourself route

    In this age of do-it-yourself everything, from ringing up groceries to preparing your own taxes, one would think more home sellers would prefer to go solo.

  • Cover story: International buyers a local submarket

    Washington, D.C., once known as a sleepy Southern town, has developed into a global city with residents from around the world working in international organizations such as the World Bank, at embassies and for corporations.

  • **FILE** In this photo from July 21, 2010, a "bank owned" sign is seen on a home that is listed as a foreclosure on a HUD website, in Hawthorne, Calif. Nearly half of the homeowners who enrolled in the Obama administration's flagship mortgage-relief program have fallen out. (Associated Press)

    Sales of existing homes plunge

    Sales of existing homes plummeted 27.2 percent to a 15-year low last month despite record-low mortgage rates, shocking markets and heightening worries that housing's steep slide will drag the rest of the economy back into recession.

  • Jobs, home sales cool hopes for spring break

    Worse-than-expected news on unemployment and home sales Thursday dampened optimism that a broad economic recovery might be near.

  • Vacation-home market has own rules

    Back in the brightest days of the housing boom, it seemed as if vacation properties in such places as Rehoboth and Dewey Beach, Del., were literally flying off the market."In 2004, prices were really appreciating rapidly," says Chris Riss, real estate agent of Jack Lingo Realtor in Rehoboth, an area so popular with Washington-area residents that it has been dubbed the nation's summer capital.

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