Topic - Slobodan Milošević

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  • Branislav Milinkovic

    Colleagues witness Serb envoy jump to his death

    Serbia's ambassador to NATO was chatting and joking with colleagues in a multistory parking garage at Brussels Airport when he suddenly strolled to a barrier, climbed over and flung himself to the ground below, a diplomat said.

  • ** FILE ** Branislav Milinkovic, Serbia's ambassador to NATO, is pictured at the alliance's headquarters in  Brussels in 2006. (AP Photo/NATO)

    Officials: Serbia's NATO ambassador leaps to death

    Serbia's ambassador to NATO was chatting and joking with colleagues in a multistory parking garage at the Brussels airport when he suddenly strolled to a barrier, climbed over and flung himself to the ground below, a diplomat said.

  • A poster depicting Gen. Ante Gotovina is seen in harbor in his hometown of Pakostane, southern Croatia, Thursday, April 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

    KUHNER: Croatia's triumph

    Croatia's national independence finally has been secured. This is the real meaning of the recent ruling by the U.N. war crimes court in The Hague to overturn the conviction of Croatian Gen. Ante Gotovina.

  • Charles Taylor

    VLASIC: Charles Taylor verdict: End to impunity

    Today is historic. For the first time in history, an international court will issue a verdict in the war crimes trial of a head of state.

  • Illustration: Bosnian Wahhabis by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

    KUHNER: Radical Islam in the heart of Europe

    Is Bosnia-Herzegovina doomed? The small Balkan nation is being subverted by powerful internal forces that threaten its existence. The West must wake up before the former Yugoslav republic descends once again into sectarian bloodshed.

  • Tribunal sentences ex-general to 27 years

    The Yugoslav war-crimes tribunal sentenced the former chief of the Yugoslav army to 27 years imprisonment Tuesday for providing crucial military aid to Bosnian Serb forces responsible for the Srebrenica massacre and for a deadly four-year campaign of shelling and sniping in Sarajevo.

  • In this photo provided by the Politika newspaper shows war crimes fugitive Goran Hadzic on Mount Fruska Gora, Serbia, Wednesday, July 20, 2011. (AP Photo/Politika newspaper, HO)

    Serbia arrests last war crimes fugitive Goran Hadzic

    The last fugitive sought by the U.N. Balkan war crimes tribunal was arrested by Serbian authorities Wednesday, answering intense international demands for his capture and boosting the country's hopes of becoming a candidate for European Union membership.

  • Illustration: Mladic graves by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

    VLASIC: Ratko Mladic arrest: Pen mightier than sword

    Ratko Mladic's initial appearance at the United Nations war crimes tribunal in The Hague Friday came almost 16 years after he allegedly presided over the largest slaughter in Europe since the Holocaust - the Srebrenica genocide. On July 11, 1995, as commander of the Bosnian Serb Army (VRS), Mladic took center stage as the VRS overran the Srebrenica "safe area" and his forces separated the men from the women in the U.N.-protected enclave.

  • Ratko Mladic (center) enters court in Belgrade, Serbia, on Thursday, May 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Serbian Government)

    KUHNER: Ethnic cleansing's ghosts

    Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb wartime commander, was captured last week. For 16 years he had been a fugitive from justice. Gen. Mladic was wanted for genocide and crimes against humanity. His arrest in Lazarevo, a small town north of Belgrade, Serbia's capital, is supposed to bring closure to the Balkan wars of the 1990s. Contrary to conventional wisdom, it won't.

  • A poster depicting Gen. Ante Gotovina is seen in harbor in his hometown of Pakostane, southern Croatia, Thursday, April 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

    KUHNER: The coming Balkan war

    Croatia is headed toward another war. The Balkans - again - will explode with violence. It is only a matter of time. And the so-called "international community" has been pivotal in stoking the flames of ethnic conflict.

  • A man walks pass a poster showing Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and reading "Support for Gadhafi", in Belgrade, Serbia, Tuesday, April 5, 2011. Serb support for the Libyan leader grows amid an escalating war in the country that reminds them of their own suffering under NATO bombs.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

    Serb nationalists love Gadhafi on Facebook page

    Five years after their leader Slobodan Milosevic died while on trial for genocide, some Serb nationalists have found a new idol: Col. Moammar Gadhafi.

  • An anti-Moammar Gadhafi rebel sit next to a mulitiple rockets launcher as flames rises from a fuel storage facility that attacked during a fighting against pro-Gadhafi fighters, in Sidr town, eastern Libya, on Wednesday, March 9, 2011. A high-ranking member of the Libyan military flew to Cairo on Wednesday with a message for Egyptian army officials from Col. Gadhafi, whose troops pounded opposition forces with artillery barrages and gunfire in at least two major cities. Col. Gadhafi appeared to be keeping up the momentum he has seized in recent days in his fight against rebels trying to move on the capital, Tripoli, from territory they hold in eastern Libya. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

    MELADY: Libya's atrocities resemble Uganda's

    The brutality of Col. Moammar Gadhafi's repression of the liberation movement in Libya is clear. He and his cohorts are using machine guns and planes to kill their own people. We saw similar brutality in the early 1970s when serving in the U.S. ambassador's post in Uganda. While all the evidence was present about the serious violations by Idi Amin, there was never a formal indictment of him by any legal jurisdiction. Amin, after an eight-year reign of terror, lived a comfortable exile in Saudi Arabia, where he died having escaped the criminal trial that he so deserved. The world should make sure that does not happen to Col. Gadhafi.

  • **FILE** Kosovo Prime Minister Hashim Thaci (Associated Press)

    White House backs Kosovo ahead of court decision

    The Obama administration is standing firmly in Kosovo's corner ahead of Thursday's International Court of Justice decision on the legality of its unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia.

  • Only a few of the Serbian artists reveal their true feelings about their leader, Slobodan Milosevic, and the horrific campaign of ethnic cleansing. The most obvious dig at this reign of terror occurs at the heart of the show where the ultimate totalitarian symbol, a swastika, forms the centerpiece of Belgrade artist Rasa Todosijevic's installation.

    ART: Serbian perspectives

    "On Normality: Art in Serbia, 1989-2001" at American University's Katzen Arts Center isn't about normality as we know it.

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