Topic - Supreme Council Of The Armed Forces

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  • Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (right) swears in newly-appointed Minister of Defense, Lt. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi (left), in Cairo on Aug. 12, 2012. (Associated Press/Egyptian presidency)

    Egypt military signals support for president

    Egypt's military signaled its acquiescence Monday to the president's surprise decision to retire the defense minister and chief of staff and seize back powers that the nation's top generals grabbed from his office.

  • Egyptian Defense Minister Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi (left), President Mohammed Morsi (center) and Armed Forces Chief of Staff Gen. Sami Annan attend a medal ceremony at a military base east of Cairo last month. The president ordered the retirement of the defense minister and chief of staff on Sunday. (Associated Press)

    Egypt's president orders military retirements

    Egypt's Islamist president ordered the retirement of the defense minister and chief of staff on Sunday and canceled the military-declared constitutional amendments that granted the top generals wide powers previously reserved for the head of state.

  • Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (right) swears in the newly-appointed defense minister, Lt. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, in Cairo on Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Egyptian Presidency)

    Egypt's president retires defense minister

    Egypt's Islamist president ordered the retirement of the defense minister and chief of staff on Sunday and canceled the military-declared constitutional amendments that granted the top generals wide powers previously reserved for the head of state.

  • Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (center) is flanked by Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi (left) and Chief of Staff Sami Anan at a ceremony at an Air Force base in Cairo on Tuesday. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton arrives in the Egyptian capital on Saturday amid growing concern in Washington that a power struggle in Egypt could imperil the transition to democratic rule. (Associated Press)

    Power at core of dispute in Egypt

    The power struggle that has pitted Egypt's first democratically elected president against his country's courts and military has drifted into murky legal waters, leaving analysts, officials and ordinary Egyptians scratching their heads over the question: who has the law on their side?

  • Hajiaj Ad Dustour, Amman, Jordan

    PIPES AND FARAHAT: Egypt's real ruler: military leader Tantawi

    What does it mean that Mohammed Morsi is the president of Egypt? The American consensus is that Egypt has been lost. However, the election was not just symbolic, but illusory. Egypt's future remains very much in play.

  • Illustration: Egypt by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

    EDITORIAL: The Islamist president's power grab

    The Arab Spring is over; the Egyptian Revolution has begun. Egypt's new president Mohammed Morsi issued a decree Sunday reconvening the country's recently dissolved parliament. Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court disagreed, saying its finding that the parliamentary election was unconstitutional was final.

  • Kamal el-Ganzouri (left), Egypt's caretaker prime minister, shakes hands with Egyptian President-elect Mohammed Morsi in Cairo on Monday, June 25, 2012. (AP Photo/Middle East News Agency)

    Egyptian court says military cannot arrest civilians

    An Egyptian court on Tuesday suspended a government decision allowing military police and intelligence to arrest civilians, a setback for the country's military rulers after the decree drew an outcry from opponents who accused them of trying to impose martial law.

  • Egypt court says military can't arrest civilians

    An Egyptian court suspended on Tuesday a government decision allowing military police and intelligence agents to arrest civilians, a setback for the country's military rulers after the decree drew an outcry from opponents who accused them of trying to impose martial law.

  • Egyptian supporters of Islamist candidate Mohammed Morsi flash victory signs June 18, 2012, as they celebrate his apparent victory in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (Associated Press)

    State Department chides Egypt's military rulers

    The State Department on Monday sharpened its criticism of Egypt's ruling military council after it granted itself broad new powers as Egyptians voted in their first free presidential election since the ouster of authoritarian leader Hosni Mubarak last year.

  • Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Morsi (foreground) and his supporters celebrate his apparent victory in the Egyptian presidential election at his campaign headquarters in Cairo on Monday, June 18, 2012. (AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa)

    Islamist claims victory in Egypt presidential vote

    Islamist candidate Mohammed Morsi declared victory Monday in Egypt's first free presidential election since Hosni Mubarak's ouster 16 months ago. But just as polls were closing, the ruling military council issued constitutional amendments that gave sweeping authority to maintain its grip on power and subordinate the nominal head of state.

  • Egyptians set up an obelisk with the names of people who were killed during the 18-day uprising as they marked in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Wednesday the first anniversary of the start of the revolt that forced President Hosni Mubarak from power. (Associated Press)

    Massive protests greet anniversary of Egypt's revolution

    Hundreds of thousands of people marched Wednesday into Tahrir Square to mark the first anniversary of Egypt's revolution, as many shouted their outrage at the military council that took over after Hosni Mubarak stepped down as president in February.

  • Election workers count ballots from this week's parliamentary elections in Luxor, Egypt, on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. (AP Photo)

    Egyptian election results delayed to Friday

    Following an unexpectedly large turnout, Egypt's election commission announced Thursday a delay in final results for the first-round of parliamentary elections, while judges monitoring the count said Islamist parties are poised to gain a parliamentary majority.

  • Protesters move away from tear gas fired by Egyptian riot police during clashes near Tahrir Square in Cairo on Nov. 21, 2011. (Associated Press)

    Egypt government offers to resign as violence grows

    Egypt's army-appointed government handed in its resignation Monday, an apparent gesture to thousands of protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square who clashed for the third straight day with security forces in violence that has killed at least 24 people and posed the most sustained challenge yet to the rule of the military.

  • ** FILE ** In this photo from Sept. 24, 2011, Egyptian riot police line up to separate pro-Mubarak supporters and the families of the slain protesters during the trial session of ousted president Hosni Mubarak in Cairo. Thousands of Egyptian police launched a nationwide strike on Monday to demand better salaries and a purge of former regime officials from senior security posts. (Associated Press)

    Activists fear Egyptian military is crushing hopes from revolution

    In the eight months since the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak, Egypt's ruling military has postponed presidential elections, extended a controversial emergency law, cracked down on peaceful demonstrators and arrested critics.

  • Egypt freezes new satellite TV station licenses

    Egypt's military rulers have frozen new licenses for private satellite TV stations and are taking steps against broadcasters they say are inciting violence, restrictions activists say harken to the crackdown on freedom of expression under ousted President Hosni Mubarak.

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