Topic - U.S. Government

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • In this pool photo of a Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, defendants speak with their defense lawyers during a break in pretrial hearings at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, April 14, 2014. From right to left are Mustafa al Hawsawi, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali, Ramzi bin al Shibh, and Khalid Sheikh Mohammad sitting on the floor with Walid bin Attash sitting on a chair. A lawyer for one of five defendants in the Sept. 11 war crimes tribunal said Monday that FBI agents questioned a member of his defense team, apparently in an investigation related to the handling of evidence, a revelation that brought an abrupt halt to proceedings. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)

    Guantanamo trial in 9/11 veers off track again

    An effort to prosecute the self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack and four co-defendants veered off track again Thursday as a pretrial hearing ended with new obstacles that threaten to further derail the case before a military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay.

  • US: Forfeiture deal over Iran assets sets record

    A federal judge has approved plans to sell a 36-story Manhattan office building and other properties owned by Iran nationwide in what will be the largest terrorism-related forfeiture ever, a prosecutor said Thursday.

  • Lawsuit: Wayne State bilked research money from US

    A lawsuit filed by a fired medical school professor says Wayne State University bilked more than $169 million in research grant money from the U.S. government.

  • Native Americans say US violated human rights

    A Native American group is asking the international community to charge the United States with human rights violations in hopes of getting help with a land claim.

  • Post, Guardian win Pulitzers for NSA revelations

    The Washington Post and The Guardian won the Pulitzer Prize in public service Monday for revealing the U.S. government's sweeping surveillance efforts in stories based on thousands of secret documents handed over by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

  • Pulitzer for NSA coverage echoes tradition in news

    Coverage of the National Security Agency's sweeping surveillance program that won the Pulitzer Prize for public service Monday follows a tradition of bucking the U.S. government on matters of secret intelligence.

  • Tampa Bay Times reporters Michael LaForgia, left, and Will Hobson, center, are congratulated by Editor and Vice President Neil Brown, right, after they won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting,  Monday, April 14, 2014 in St. Petersburg, Fla. Hobson and LaForgia won in local reporting for writing about the squalid housing for the city's homeless. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, James Borchuck)

    Post, Guardian win Pulitzers for NSA revelations

    The Washington Post and The Guardian won the Pulitzer Prize in public service Monday for revealing the U.S. government's sweeping surveillance programs in a blockbuster series of stories based on secret documents supplied by NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

  • FILE - In this Nov. 27, 2012 file photo provided by U.S. lawyer James L. Berenthal, jailed American Alan Gross poses for a photo during a visit by Rabbi Elie Abadie and Berenthal at Finlay military hospital in Havana, Cuba. Gross, a U.S. government subcontractor imprisoned in Cuba, released a statement through his lawyer Tuesday, April 8, 2014, saying he began fasting to protest his treatment by the governments of Cuba and the United States. (AP Photo/James L. Berenthal, File)

    Cuba 'concerned' over American's hunger strike

    The Cuban government said Wednesday it is concerned about a jailed U.S. government subcontractor's hunger strike, which he began last week to protest both Havana's and Washington's handling of his case.

  • 'Cuban Twitter' a new hurdle for bloggers, exiles

    The revelation that a U.S. government-funded program set up a cellphone-based social network in Cuba is likely to pose new challenges for independent bloggers and exile groups that work to increase access to technology.

  • US secretly created 'Cuban Twitter' to stir unrest

    In July 2010, Joe McSpedon, a U.S. government official, flew to Barcelona to put the final touches on a secret plan to build a social media project aimed at undermining Cuba's communist government.

  • Cuban-Americans react to secret Twitter project

    Cuban-Americans are divided over the revelation by The Associated Press that the U.S. government spent millions of dollars to secretly create a "Cuban Twitter" designed to undermine the island's communist government.

  • White House press secretary Jay Carney speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, Monday, March 31, 2014. Carney was asked several questions about the deadline for people to sign up for the health care under the Affordable Care Act. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

    White House: Cuba Internet program no secret

    The White House on Thursday denied that the U.S. government secretly built a covert social network in Cuba designed to push citizens there toward dissent.

  • US confirms warrantless searches of Americans

    The Obama administration has conducted warrantless searches of Americans' communications as part of the National Security Agency's surveillance operations that target foreigners located outside of the U.S., the administration's top intelligence official confirmed in a letter to Congress disclosed Tuesday.

  • FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Marshal's office shows Adel Daoud, of Hillside, Ill. Prosecutors say a judge's decision granting lawyers in Daoud's terrorism case unprecedented access to secret intelligence-court records could jeopardize national security. In an appeal filed Monday, March 31, 2014, with the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, prosecutors said another court "misjudged the damage to national security" by opening the documents. (AP Photo/U.S. Marshal's office, File)

    US appeals ruling to let lawyers see secret files

    A decision by a trial judge in Chicago to grant lawyers for a terrorism suspect unprecedented access to secret intelligence-court records would be a "sea change" in how such sensitive documents are handled and could end up jeopardizing national security, U.S. government attorneys argue in a hard-hitting appeal filed on Monday.

  • Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon Democrat, said the National Security Agency "has knowingly acquired tens of thousands of wholly domestic communications  even though this law was specifically written to prohibit the warrantless acquisition of wholly domestic communications." (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    Sen. Wyden: U.S. intelligen​ce community needs to be more transparen​t; reforms will help

    A top Democratic senator says President Obama's decision to slow down the U.S. government's bulk collection of phone records, placing more faith in private companies, is a step in the right direction.

More Stories →

Happening Now